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Article

Assessing Consumer Acceptance and Willingness to Pay for Novel Value-Added Products Made from Breadfruit in the Hawaiian Islands

1
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences (PLEN), Crop Sciences, Climate and Food Security, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Højbakkegård Allé 30, DK-2630 Taastrup, Denmark
2
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 25, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3135; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113135
Received: 11 March 2019 / Revised: 17 May 2019 / Accepted: 25 May 2019 / Published: 3 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Systems – The Importance of Consumption)
Breadfruit is a high yielding tree crop with a long history in the Pacific Islands, with the potential to improve food security under climate change. Traditionally, it has been grown and used extensively as a food source in Hawaii, but in the past decades, it has been neglected, underutilized, and supplanted by imported staple foods. Revitalization of breadfruit is central for reducing dependency on food imports and increasing food resiliency and self-sufficiency in Hawaii. Such a process could potentially be strengthened by the development of novel value-added products. This empirical study investigates consumer acceptance and willingness to pay in two scenarios: with and without detailed product information about breadfruit and its cultural significance, nutritional benefits and potential contribution to increase local food security. A total of 440 consumers participated in the study. Participants receiving descriptive information had a higher level of acceptance and were willing to pay a higher price compared with participants who were not informed that the product was made from breadfruit: 1.33 ± 0.15 acceptance on the hedonic scale and 1.26 ± 0.23 USD (both p < 0.0001). In conclusion, repeated exposure and building a positive narrative around breadfruit products may increase consumer acceptability. View Full-Text
Keywords: descriptive information; cultural significance; food security; local foods; liking; consumers descriptive information; cultural significance; food security; local foods; liking; consumers
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lysák, M.; Ritz, C.; Henriksen, C.B. Assessing Consumer Acceptance and Willingness to Pay for Novel Value-Added Products Made from Breadfruit in the Hawaiian Islands. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3135. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113135

AMA Style

Lysák M, Ritz C, Henriksen CB. Assessing Consumer Acceptance and Willingness to Pay for Novel Value-Added Products Made from Breadfruit in the Hawaiian Islands. Sustainability. 2019; 11(11):3135. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113135

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lysák, Marin, Christian Ritz, and Christian B. Henriksen 2019. "Assessing Consumer Acceptance and Willingness to Pay for Novel Value-Added Products Made from Breadfruit in the Hawaiian Islands" Sustainability 11, no. 11: 3135. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113135

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