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Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2424; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072424

Environmental Quantification of the Existing Waste Management System in a Developing World Municipality Using EaseTech: The Case of Bahawalpur, Pakistan

1
College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54600, Pakistan
2
Department of Space Science, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54600, Pakistan
3
Department of Environmental Science and Policy, Lahore School of Economics, Lahore 53200, Pakistan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 May 2018 / Revised: 7 July 2018 / Accepted: 9 July 2018 / Published: 11 July 2018
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Abstract

Evaluation of existing operational and managerial provisions and identification of specific actions that fit and impact in a local context is key to find sustainable solutions. The study aims to develop an understanding of existing waste management practices for a medium sized city of Pakistan and to quantify the related environmental impacts using life cycle assessment (LCA). The existing waste management system in “Bahawalpur”, a city with predominant rural-urban infusion, is characterized by straining resources, low generation rates (0.424 kg/capita/day), prominent source separation, high scavenging activities and open dumping practices. The waste composition analysis proposes organic wastes as the largest constituent (64%) followed by recyclables (27%) and inerts (9%). The LCA model “EaseTech” used to quantify the environmental performance of existing waste management arrangements illustrated that existing waste management system in Bahawalpur City has tangible effects on climate change (3.16 × 107 kg CO2-Eq) and ecotoxicity (3.12 × 106 CTU) categories, while depletion of abiotic resources fossil (−9.60 × 107) category points up most environmental savings. Significant environmental compensations for different impact categories are offered due to high source separation and recycling trade off. The overview necessitates suitable modification in existing waste disposal practice that poses severe impacts on the environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: waste management; life cycle assessment; developing countries; EaseTech; impact assessment; climate change; Ecotoxicty waste management; life cycle assessment; developing countries; EaseTech; impact assessment; climate change; Ecotoxicty
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Majeed, A.; Batool, S.A.; Chaudhry, M.N. Environmental Quantification of the Existing Waste Management System in a Developing World Municipality Using EaseTech: The Case of Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Sustainability 2018, 10, 2424.

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