Next Article in Journal
Assessing Multiple Pathways for Achieving China’s National Emissions Reduction Target
Previous Article in Journal
Analyzing Transfer Commuting Attitudes Using a Market Segmentation Approach
Previous Article in Special Issue
Oleotourism: Local Actors for Local Tourism Development
Open AccessArticle

A Countryside to Sip: Venice Inland and the Prosecco’s Uneasy Relationship with Wine Tourism and Rural Exploitation

Department of Economics, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Cannareggio 873, 30121 Venezia, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2195; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072195
Received: 12 May 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 15 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developing Tourism in Rural and Agricultural Regions)
In 2016, Italian production of wine exceeded 51 million hectolitres and among the twenty regions, the region with the most production by volume (millions of hectolitres) was the Veneto region, north-east of Italy, with almost 11 million. In particular, the success of Prosecco at the global level is the most important driving factor at both the economic and productivity levels. The worldwide success of Prosecco wine entails a remarkable change in both the local and regional configuration of agrarian landscapes. Traditional winegrowing swiftly changed into an intensive monoculture with remarkable investments and the spread of new viticulture entrepreneurships. The discussion proposed here intends to investigate the process of heritage construction or ‘heritagisation’, UNESCO candidacy, as an important issue for rural tourism promotion in the context of a productive winescape. We concentrated our analysis on the DOCG area, a complex space where several forces need to coexist; the productive drive of growing requests (global and local) of Prosecco, as well as rural representation based on local habits and a concrete hilly landscape. Rural tourism is clearly an important sector in terms of revenue and employment, especially for local communities, and it can help to ensure economic stability; however, doing so in a way that benefits the area and the landscape is not so straightforward. There are potential problems in facilitating increased urbanization, such as the standardization of landscape and damage to the area if plans are mismanaged. In the case of best practices, a desirable model of tourism can be tapped into while helping rural regions take advantage of more sustainable tourism development and landscape management. View Full-Text
Keywords: rural tourism; Prosecco; heritagisation; landscape management; sustainable activities rural tourism; Prosecco; heritagisation; landscape management; sustainable activities
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Visentin, F.; Vallerani, F. A Countryside to Sip: Venice Inland and the Prosecco’s Uneasy Relationship with Wine Tourism and Rural Exploitation. Sustainability 2018, 10, 2195.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop