Next Article in Journal
Effects of Forest Restoration on Soil Carbon, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Their Stoichiometry in Hunan, Southern China
Next Article in Special Issue
Urban Green Space Suitability Evaluation Based on the AHP-CV Combined Weight Method: A Case Study of Fuping County, China
Previous Article in Journal
Determinants of Enterprises Radical Innovation and Performance: Insights into Strategic Orientation of Cultural and Creative Enterprises
Previous Article in Special Issue
Study on the Delimitation of the Urban Development Boundary in a Special Economic Zone: A Case Study of the Central Urban Area of Doumen in Zhuhai, China
Open AccessArticle

Urban Foraging in Berlin: People, Plants and Practices within the Metropolitan Green Infrastructure

1
Department of Ecology, Ecosystem Science/Plant Ecology, Technische Universität Berlin, Rothenburgstr. 12, D-12165 Berlin, Germany
2
Berlin-Brandenburg Institute of Advanced Biodiversity Research (BBIB), D-14195 Berlin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 1873; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061873
Received: 16 May 2018 / Revised: 1 June 2018 / Accepted: 2 June 2018 / Published: 4 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metropolitan Green Infrastructure and Sustainable Urban Growth)
Gathering wild plants in cities (urban foraging) is likely an important, but understudied human-nature interaction globally. As large European cities are critically understudied in this regard, we performed in-depth ethnography-based interviews in Berlin, Germany, to shed light on the cultural background of foragers, their motivations and which plants and fungi are gathered for which purposes. Results demonstrate multiple uses of 125 taxa, mostly frequently-occurring species but also some Red List species, from a range of formal and informal greenspace types. Both native and non-native species were gathered, with significant differences in use patterns. Use for food was most common, followed by medicinal uses, and personal enjoyment was a frequent motivation, indicating that urban foraging combines provisioning and cultural ecosystem services. Familial and childhood foraging exposure were common, pointing to influences of early-in-life exposure on later-in-life activities and transgenerational aspects of the practice. Results further suggest legacy effects from the post-war and communist eras on foraging knowledge. Although non-commercial foraging is allowed in Berlin, over-harvesting was not evident. Interviews indicate that stewardship of urban biodiversity is common among foragers. Results thus suggest considering urban foraging as a promising vehicle for linking humans with nature when developing a biodiverse urban green infrastructure. View Full-Text
Keywords: biocultural diversity; edible weeds; endangered plant species; gathering activity; provisioning ecosystem services; urban biodiversity; urban collecting; urban greenspace; urban NTFPs; wild food biocultural diversity; edible weeds; endangered plant species; gathering activity; provisioning ecosystem services; urban biodiversity; urban collecting; urban greenspace; urban NTFPs; wild food
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Landor-Yamagata, J.L.; Kowarik, I.; Fischer, L.K. Urban Foraging in Berlin: People, Plants and Practices within the Metropolitan Green Infrastructure. Sustainability 2018, 10, 1873. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061873

AMA Style

Landor-Yamagata JL, Kowarik I, Fischer LK. Urban Foraging in Berlin: People, Plants and Practices within the Metropolitan Green Infrastructure. Sustainability. 2018; 10(6):1873. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061873

Chicago/Turabian Style

Landor-Yamagata, Jonah L.; Kowarik, Ingo; Fischer, Leonie K. 2018. "Urban Foraging in Berlin: People, Plants and Practices within the Metropolitan Green Infrastructure" Sustainability 10, no. 6: 1873. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061873

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop