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Article

Analysis of Biomass Blend Co-Firing for Post Combustion CO2 Capture

1
Department of Risk Assessment in Industry, Central Mining Institute, Plac Gwarków 1, Katowice 40-166, Poland
2
Science Secretary in Central Mining Institute, Plac Gwarków 1, Katowice 40-166, Poland
3
Department of Mathematics, University of Oviedo, Calle Federico García Lorca 18, 33007 Oviedo, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 923; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040923
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 20 March 2018 / Published: 22 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clean Coal Technologies)
The correct conduction of the CO2 capture process in coal-fired power plants with the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) requires constant process parameter monitoring and ensuring a specific flue gas chemical composition. One of the most common problems in these types of installations is the progressive corrosion and degradation of the valuable solvent. Despite the established reduction levels of oxygen and impurities entering into irreversible reactions with the absorber, the flue gas composition may change as a daily and annual function of time. The article presents a detailed analysis of the flue gas components that have the greatest influence on carbon dioxide capture installation technical safety, i.e., SOx, NOx, O2, and fly ash. The analysis was based on the results of experiments conducted at the Jaworzno III Tauron Wytwarzanie SA Polish coal power plant. The results show a significant influence of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process on MEA oxidative degradation. The amount of oxygen in flue gas during biomass and coal blend co-firing was nearly twice as low compared to pure coal combustion. Differences were also observed in the amounts of gas impurities with relation to the time of year and time of day of power plant operation. View Full-Text
Keywords: coal-fired power plants; co-combustion; monoethanolamine; flue gas composition coal-fired power plants; co-combustion; monoethanolamine; flue gas composition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Więckol-Ryk, A.; Krzemień, A.; Smoliński, A.; Lasheras, F.S. Analysis of Biomass Blend Co-Firing for Post Combustion CO2 Capture. Sustainability 2018, 10, 923. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040923

AMA Style

Więckol-Ryk A, Krzemień A, Smoliński A, Lasheras FS. Analysis of Biomass Blend Co-Firing for Post Combustion CO2 Capture. Sustainability. 2018; 10(4):923. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040923

Chicago/Turabian Style

Więckol-Ryk, Angelika, Alicja Krzemień, Adam Smoliński, and Fernando S. Lasheras. 2018. "Analysis of Biomass Blend Co-Firing for Post Combustion CO2 Capture" Sustainability 10, no. 4: 923. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040923

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