Next Article in Journal
Anthropogenic Impact on Erosion Intensity: Case Study of Rural Areas of Pirot and Dimitrovgrad Municipalities, Serbia
Next Article in Special Issue
Assessment of Building Damage Risk by Natural Disasters in South Korea Using Decision Tree Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Shifting Scarcities? The Energy Intensity of Water Supply Alternatives in the Mass Tourist Resort of Benidorm, Spain
Previous Article in Special Issue
Post-Disaster Business Recovery and Sustainable Development: A Study of 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake
Open AccessArticle

Traditional and Local Knowledge Practices for Disaster Risk Reduction in Northern Ghana

1
United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS), 5-53-70 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8925, Japan
2
Integrated Research System for Sustainability Science (IR3S), The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654, Japan
3
Kazuhiko Takeuchi Centre for Sustainability and Resilience, University for Development Studies, Wa and Nyankpala Campuses, 1350 Tamale, Ghana
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 825; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030825
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 15 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disasters, Crisis, Hazards, Emergencies and Sustainable Development)
In order to deal with recurrent disasters, like floods and droughts coupled with the limited adaptive capacity, in the semiarid regions of Northern Ghana, local communities have no choice but to apply traditional and local knowledge practices. This study seeks to identify such practices employed in selected rural communities in Northern Ghana and to investigate their effectiveness. Data were collected through key informant interviews, household questionnaire surveys, focus group discussions, and participant observations. The findings indicated that although diverse practices were applied to predict and manage local disaster events, skepticism prevailed among locals toward these practices regarding their effectiveness. Due to the lack of science-based tools and systems for disaster prediction and management, local communities continually depended on these knowledge systems and practices. Integrating local and traditional disaster risk reduction (DRR) efforts into modern scientific knowledge should be encouraged in order to reduce the vulnerability of local communities to disasters with thorough effectiveness evaluation protocols. View Full-Text
Keywords: disasters; disaster risk reduction; traditional and local knowledge; coping practices disasters; disaster risk reduction; traditional and local knowledge; coping practices
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Macnight Ngwese, N.; Saito, O.; Sato, A.; Agyeman Boafo, Y.; Jasaw, G. Traditional and Local Knowledge Practices for Disaster Risk Reduction in Northern Ghana. Sustainability 2018, 10, 825.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop