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Article

Addressing Misconceptions to the Concept of Resilience in Environmental Education

1
Center for the Development of Global Leadership Education, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8654, Japan
2
Advanced Systems Analysis Group, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria
3
Graduate Program in Sustainability Science—Global Leadership Initiative (GPSS-GLI), Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 277-8563, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4682; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124682
Received: 29 October 2018 / Revised: 29 November 2018 / Accepted: 6 December 2018 / Published: 9 December 2018
Environmental education is shaped in response to societal and environmental realities and it reflects new interests and demands that enable sustainable transformations. In recent years, the concept of resilience has taken an increasingly significant role among practitioners, researchers, policymakers, and especially within the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Despite its growing importance, the literature surrounding the concept of resilience has struggled to find a consensus on definitions and measurements and therefore may be easily misconceived. In this avenue, a consensus among varying perspectives of resilience may be better achieved by understanding the interaction between students’ prior knowledge (pre-conception) of resilience and the knowledge provided by educators. Based on the case study of five courses that teach the concept of this paper firstly identifies and discusses three common misconceptions among students, focusing on the concept of socio-ecological resilience. These include misconceptions to the value judgment, adaptability, and the costs that are relevant to the concept of resilience. Secondly, this paper discusses educational tools derived from scenario planning and theoretical foundations underlying empirical approaches to the concept of resilience, which may benefit educators in enabling critical thinking to address such common misconceptions. This paper may contribute to ongoing discussions in the environmental education literature, specifically to both pedagogy and curriculum focusing on the concept of resilience. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental education; resilience; misconceptions; scenario planning; systems thinking environmental education; resilience; misconceptions; scenario planning; systems thinking
MDPI and ACS Style

Kharrazi, A.; Kudo, S.; Allasiw, D. Addressing Misconceptions to the Concept of Resilience in Environmental Education. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4682. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124682

AMA Style

Kharrazi A, Kudo S, Allasiw D. Addressing Misconceptions to the Concept of Resilience in Environmental Education. Sustainability. 2018; 10(12):4682. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124682

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kharrazi, Ali, Shogo Kudo, and Doreen Allasiw. 2018. "Addressing Misconceptions to the Concept of Resilience in Environmental Education" Sustainability 10, no. 12: 4682. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124682

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