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Open AccessArticle

Transition Management for Improving the Sustainability of WASH Services in Informal Settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa—An Exploration

1
DRIFT (Dutch Research Institute for Transitions), Erasmus University Rotterdam, P.O. Box 1738, 3000DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Design, Art and Technology, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda
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Department of Civil Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana
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WISE—Futures: Centre for Water Infrastructure and Sustainable Energy Futures, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, 23311 Nelson Mandela Road, Arusha, Tanzania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 4052; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10114052
Received: 30 August 2018 / Revised: 10 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 October 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
This paper explores how transition management processes can be designed to address the unsustainability of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services in informal settlements in cities in Sub-Saharan Africa. The unsustainability of services related to WASH in informal settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa is deeply embedded in current societal and governance structures, cultures, and practices; it is context-dependent and involves numerous actors with different interests. Based on a literature review and empirical work in Arusha (Tanzania), Dodowa (Ghana), and Kampala (Uganda), we identify five context dimensions that account for the unsustainability of WASH services: (a) multiplicity of WASH practices, structures, and arrangements; (b) governance capacities for WASH services and maintenance; (c) landownership for sustainable access to WASH; (d) public participation in decision-making related to WASH; and (e) socio-economic inequalities governing access to WASH. These dimensions pose numerous conceptual and application challenges for transition management. Based on these challenges, recommendations are formulated for the design of a contextualized, participatory transition management process that is not only functional, but also emancipatory. View Full-Text
Keywords: Sub-Saharan Africa; transition management; WASH; informal settlements; sustainability transitions Sub-Saharan Africa; transition management; WASH; informal settlements; sustainability transitions
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MDPI and ACS Style

Silvestri, G.; Wittmayer, J.M.; Schipper, K.; Kulabako, R.; Oduro-Kwarteng, S.; Nyenje, P.; Komakech, H.; Van Raak, R. Transition Management for Improving the Sustainability of WASH Services in Informal Settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa—An Exploration. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4052.

AMA Style

Silvestri G, Wittmayer JM, Schipper K, Kulabako R, Oduro-Kwarteng S, Nyenje P, Komakech H, Van Raak R. Transition Management for Improving the Sustainability of WASH Services in Informal Settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa—An Exploration. Sustainability. 2018; 10(11):4052.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Silvestri, Giorgia; Wittmayer, Julia M.; Schipper, Karlijn; Kulabako, Robinah; Oduro-Kwarteng, Sampson; Nyenje, Philip; Komakech, Hans; Van Raak, Roel. 2018. "Transition Management for Improving the Sustainability of WASH Services in Informal Settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa—An Exploration" Sustainability 10, no. 11: 4052.

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