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Open AccessArticle

Fish Value Chain and Its Impact on Rural Households’ Income: Lessons Learned from Northern Ethiopia

by 1 and 2,3,4,*
1
College of Business and Economics, Department of Management, Mekelle University, P.O.Box 231 Mekelle, Ethiopia
2
Department of Geography, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
3
Department of Engineering Management, University of Antwerp, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
4
Research Group Climate Change and Security, Institute of Geography, University of Hamburg, 21073 Hamburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3759; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103759
Received: 12 August 2018 / Revised: 9 October 2018 / Accepted: 10 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue More Food or Better Distribution)
These days, one of the global challenges is the growing demand for food. To be more specific, seafood bases play a key role in filling the nutritional requirements of human beings. In Africa (Ethiopia) the public expenses to improve productive capacity in aquatic food are increasing. Additionally, the expenses in dams and in fishers’ capacity building have increased households’ engagement in the fishery sector in Ethiopia. Cooperatives’ productive capacity has been strengthened by the government and other non-government organizations with the supply of fishing boats, refrigerators, fish nets and other office supplies. However, the effect of such public expenses in bringing changes in the households’ livelihood and welfare has never been assessed in this study area. This paper aims to investigate what motivates the households to fish and assess the effect of fisheries on the households’ livelihood and welfare. A structured survey consisting of 313 rural households was administered using trained enumerators in two kebeles located close to the Tekeze dam, Northern Ethiopia. The result indicates that socioeconomic characteristics, such as age (young), sex, education, and active family size were driving the households to fishing. Access to market and access to support are driving farmers to fisheries. There is a significant difference in fishing households’ income which is higher than non-fishing households. The results also indicate that there are lesser income inequalities among fishery households operating in cooperatives compared to private fishery households. View Full-Text
Keywords: cooperative; food security; food supply; fishery; value chain; livelihood and welfare; Ethiopia cooperative; food security; food supply; fishery; value chain; livelihood and welfare; Ethiopia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alemu, A.E.; Azadi, H. Fish Value Chain and Its Impact on Rural Households’ Income: Lessons Learned from Northern Ethiopia. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3759. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103759

AMA Style

Alemu AE, Azadi H. Fish Value Chain and Its Impact on Rural Households’ Income: Lessons Learned from Northern Ethiopia. Sustainability. 2018; 10(10):3759. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103759

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alemu, Abebe E.; Azadi, Hossein. 2018. "Fish Value Chain and Its Impact on Rural Households’ Income: Lessons Learned from Northern Ethiopia" Sustainability 10, no. 10: 3759. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103759

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