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Article

Tree Species Diversity and Socioeconomic Perspectives of the Urban (Food) Forest of Accra, Ghana

1
Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA), 12 Anmeda Street, PMB CT 173, Accra 233, Ghana
2
Department of Forest Resources Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, PMB, University Post Office, Kumasi 233, Ghana
3
Department of Agricultural Extension, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 68, Legon, GA-492-3175 Accra, Ghana
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3417; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103417
Received: 30 June 2018 / Revised: 12 September 2018 / Accepted: 21 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
Urban and peri-urban forestry has emerged as a complementary measure to contribute towards eliminating urban hunger and improved nutritional security. However, there is scanty knowledge about the composition, diversity, and socioeconomic contributions of urban food trees in African cities. This paper examines the diversity and composition of the urban forest and food trees of Accra and sheds light on perceptions of urbanites regarding food tree cultivation and availability in the city. Using a mixed methods approach, 105 respondents in six neighborhoods of Accra were interviewed while over 200 plots (100-m2 each) were surveyed across five land use types. Twenty-two out of the 70 woody species in Accra have edible parts (leaves, fruits, flowers, etc.). The food-tree abundance in the city is about half of the total number of trees enumerated. The species richness and abundance of the food trees and all trees in the city were significantly different among land use types (p < 0.0001) and neighborhood types (p < 0.0001). The diversity of food-bearing tree species was much higher in the poorer neighborhoods than in the wealthier neighborhoods. Respondents in wealthier neighborhoods indicated that tree and food-tree cover of the city was generally low and showed greater interest in cultivating food (fruit) trees and expanding urban forest cover than poorer neighborhoods. These findings demonstrate the need for urban food policy reforms that integrate urban-grown tree foods in the urban food system/culture. View Full-Text
Keywords: mixed methods; richness; edible; food bearing; neighborhoods mixed methods; richness; edible; food bearing; neighborhoods
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nero, B.F.; Kwapong, N.A.; Jatta, R.; Fatunbi, O. Tree Species Diversity and Socioeconomic Perspectives of the Urban (Food) Forest of Accra, Ghana. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3417. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103417

AMA Style

Nero BF, Kwapong NA, Jatta R, Fatunbi O. Tree Species Diversity and Socioeconomic Perspectives of the Urban (Food) Forest of Accra, Ghana. Sustainability. 2018; 10(10):3417. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103417

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nero, Bertrand F.; Kwapong, Nana A.; Jatta, Raymond; Fatunbi, Oluwole. 2018. "Tree Species Diversity and Socioeconomic Perspectives of the Urban (Food) Forest of Accra, Ghana" Sustainability 10, no. 10: 3417. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103417

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