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Article

Quality in Clinical Consultations: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Department of Endocrinology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London NW1 2BU, UK
2
Department of Neurosurgery, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London WC1N 3BG, UK
3
Lorn and Islands Hospital, Oban PA34 4HH, UK
4
Centre for Obesity & Metabolism, Department of Experimental & Translational Medicine, Division of Medicine, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Anna Capasso
Clin. Pract. 2022, 12(4), 545-556; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract12040058
Received: 24 May 2022 / Revised: 23 June 2022 / Accepted: 4 July 2022 / Published: 14 July 2022
The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic may have affected the quality of clinical consultations. The objective was to use 10 proposed quality indicator questions to assess outpatient consultation quality; to assess whether the recent shift to telemedicine during the pandemic has affected consultation quality; and to determine whether consultation quality is associated with satisfaction and consultation outcome. A cross-sectional study was used to survey clinicians and patients after outpatient consultations (1 February to 31 March 2021). The consultation quality score (CQS) was the sum of ‘yes’ responses to the survey questions. In total, 78% (538/690) of consultations conducted were assessed by a patient, clinician, or both. Patient survey response rate was 60% (415/690) and clinician 42% (291/690). Face-to-face consultations had a greater CQS than telephone (patients and clinicians < 0.001). A greater CQS was associated with higher overall satisfaction (clinicians log-odds: 0.77 ± 0.52, p = 0.004; patients log-odds: 1.35 ± 0.57, p < 0.001) and with definitive consultation outcomes (clinician log-odds: 0.44 ± 0.36, p = 0.03). In conclusion, consultation quality is assessable; the shift to telemedicine has negatively impacted consultation quality; and high-quality consultations are associated with greater satisfaction and definitive consultation outcome decisions. View Full-Text
Keywords: clinical consultations; COVID-19 pandemic; quality; telemedicine clinical consultations; COVID-19 pandemic; quality; telemedicine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Graf, A.; Koh, C.H.; Caldwell, G.; Grieve, J.; Tan, M.; Hassan, J.; Bakaya, K.; Marcus, H.J.; Baldeweg, S.E. Quality in Clinical Consultations: A Cross-Sectional Study. Clin. Pract. 2022, 12, 545-556. https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract12040058

AMA Style

Graf A, Koh CH, Caldwell G, Grieve J, Tan M, Hassan J, Bakaya K, Marcus HJ, Baldeweg SE. Quality in Clinical Consultations: A Cross-Sectional Study. Clinics and Practice. 2022; 12(4):545-556. https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract12040058

Chicago/Turabian Style

Graf, Anneke, Chan Hee Koh, Gordon Caldwell, Joan Grieve, Melissa Tan, Jasmine Hassan, Kaushiki Bakaya, Hani J. Marcus, and Stephanie E. Baldeweg. 2022. "Quality in Clinical Consultations: A Cross-Sectional Study" Clinics and Practice 12, no. 4: 545-556. https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract12040058

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