Next Article in Journal
Modeling and Simulation Tools for Fog Computing—A Comprehensive Survey from a Cost Perspective
Next Article in Special Issue
A Bibliometric Overview of Twitter-Related Studies Indexed in Web of Science
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Language-Independent Fake News Detection: English, Portuguese, and Spanish Mutual Features
Open AccessConcept Paper

RE-examining the Effect of Online Social Support on Subjective Well-Being: The Moderating Role of Experience

1
Department of Information Management, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan
2
Department of International Business, Ming Chuan University, Taipei 11103, Taiwan
3
College of Management, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Future Internet 2020, 12(5), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi12050088
Received: 22 April 2020 / Revised: 7 May 2020 / Accepted: 9 May 2020 / Published: 15 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Web, New Media, Algorithms and Power)
Building upon the perspectives of social capital theory, social support, and experience, this study developed a theoretical model to investigate the determinants of subjective well-being on social media. This study also examined the moderating role of experience on the relationship between subjective well-being and social support. Data collected from 267 social media users in Taiwan were used to test the proposed model. Structural equation modeling analysis was used to test the measurement model and the structural model. The findings reveal that receiving online support and providing online support are the key predictors of subjective well-being. Furthermore, social capital positively influences the reception and provision of online support. Finally, providing online support has a significant effect on the subjective well-being of users with low levels of use experience, while receiving online support exerts a stronger influence on the subjective well-being of users with high levels of use experience. View Full-Text
Keywords: social media; social-support activities; subjective well-being; social capital theory; experience social media; social-support activities; subjective well-being; social capital theory; experience
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hsu, M.-H.; Chang, C.-M.; Wu, S.-L. RE-examining the Effect of Online Social Support on Subjective Well-Being: The Moderating Role of Experience. Future Internet 2020, 12, 88.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop