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Review

Feline Morbillivirus Infection in Domestic Cats: What Have We Learned So Far?

1
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell’Abruzzo e Molise (IZSAM), 64100 Teramo, Italy
2
Center for Vaccines and Immunology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605, USA
3
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary University Hospital, University of Teramo, 64100 Teramo, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current affiliation: Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30605, USA.
Academic Editor: Christopher C. Broder
Viruses 2021, 13(4), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040683
Received: 22 March 2021 / Revised: 13 April 2021 / Accepted: 13 April 2021 / Published: 15 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Viruses: State-of-the-Art Research in Italy)
Feline morbillivirus (FeMV) was identified for the first time in stray cats in 2012 in Hong Kong and, since its discovery, it was reported in domestic cats worldwide. Although a potential association between FeMV infection and tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) has been suggested, this has not been proven, and the subject remains controversial. TIN is the most frequent histopathological finding in the context of feline chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is one of the major clinical pathologies in feline medicine. FeMV research has mainly focused on defining the epidemiology, the role of FeMV in the development of CKD, and its in vitro tropism, but the pathogenicity of FeMV is still not clear, partly due to its distinctive biological characteristics, as well as to a lack of a cell culture system for its rapid isolation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of FeMV infection, including genetic diversity of FeMV strains, epidemiology, pathogenicity, and clinicopathological findings observed in naturally infected cats. View Full-Text
Keywords: feline morbillivirus; genetic heterogeneity; epidemiology; kidney disease; tropism; diagnosis feline morbillivirus; genetic heterogeneity; epidemiology; kidney disease; tropism; diagnosis
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MDPI and ACS Style

De Luca, E.; Sautto, G.A.; Crisi, P.E.; Lorusso, A. Feline Morbillivirus Infection in Domestic Cats: What Have We Learned So Far? Viruses 2021, 13, 683. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040683

AMA Style

De Luca E, Sautto GA, Crisi PE, Lorusso A. Feline Morbillivirus Infection in Domestic Cats: What Have We Learned So Far? Viruses. 2021; 13(4):683. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040683

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Luca, Eliana, Giuseppe A. Sautto, Paolo E. Crisi, and Alessio Lorusso. 2021. "Feline Morbillivirus Infection in Domestic Cats: What Have We Learned So Far?" Viruses 13, no. 4: 683. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040683

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