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Exploring the Prospects of Engineered Newcastle Disease Virus in Modern Vaccinology

1
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University PMB, Sokoto 2346, Nigeria
2
Laboratory of Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor 43400, Malaysia
3
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor 43400, Malaysia
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Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia Serdang, Selangor 43400, Malaysia
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Department of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia Serdang, Selangor 43400, Malaysia
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Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University PMB, Sokoto 2346, Nigeria
7
Department of Virology, Wageningen Bioveterinary Research, POB 65, NL8200 Lelystad, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Viruses 2020, 12(4), 451; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12040451
Received: 21 February 2020 / Revised: 13 March 2020 / Accepted: 15 March 2020 / Published: 16 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Application of Viruses to Biotechnology)
Many traditional vaccines have proven to be incapable of controlling newly emerging infectious diseases. They have also achieved limited success in the fight against a variety of human cancers. Thus, innovative vaccine strategies are highly needed to overcome the global burden of these diseases. Advances in molecular biology and reverse genetics have completely restructured the concept of vaccinology, leading to the emergence of state-of-the-art technologies for vaccine design, development and delivery. Among these modern vaccine technologies are the recombinant viral vectored vaccines, which are known for their incredible specificity in antigen delivery as well as the induction of robust immune responses in the vaccinated hosts. Although a number of viruses have been used as vaccine vectors, genetically engineered Newcastle disease virus (NDV) possesses some useful attributes that make it a preferable candidate for vectoring vaccine antigens. Here, we review the molecular biology of NDV and discuss the reverse genetics approaches used to engineer the virus into an efficient vaccine vector. We then discuss the prospects of the engineered virus as an efficient vehicle of vaccines against cancer and several infectious diseases of man and animals. View Full-Text
Keywords: Newcastle disease virus; reverse genetics; vaccines; infectious diseases; cancer Newcastle disease virus; reverse genetics; vaccines; infectious diseases; cancer
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Bello, M.B.; Yusoff, K.; Ideris, A.; Hair-Bejo, M.; Jibril, A.H.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Omar, A.R. Exploring the Prospects of Engineered Newcastle Disease Virus in Modern Vaccinology. Viruses 2020, 12, 451.

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