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Open AccessArticle

Understanding the Evolutionary Ecology of host–pathogen Interactions Provides Insights into the Outcomes of Insect Pest Biocontrol

by David J. Páez 1,*,† and Arietta E. Fleming-Davies 2,*,†
1
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, The University of Washington, 1122 NE Boat St, Box 355020, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2
Department of Biology, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Viruses 2020, 12(2), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12020141
Received: 10 December 2019 / Revised: 15 January 2020 / Accepted: 17 January 2020 / Published: 25 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Viruses and Pest Management)
The use of viral pathogens to control the population size of pest insects has produced both successful and unsuccessful outcomes. Here, we investigate whether those biocontrol successes and failures can be explained by key ecological and evolutionary processes between hosts and pathogens. Specifically, we examine how heterogeneity in pathogen transmission, ecological and evolutionary tradeoffs, and pathogen diversity affect insect population density and thus successful control. We first review the existing literature and then use numerical simulations of mathematical models to further explore these processes. Our results show that the control of insect densities using viruses depends strongly on the heterogeneity of virus transmission among insects. Overall, increased heterogeneity of transmission reduces the effect of viruses on insect densities and increases the long-term stability of insect populations. Lower equilibrium insect densities occur when transmission is heritable and when there is a tradeoff between mean transmission and insect fecundity compared to when the heterogeneity of transmission arises from non-genetic sources. Thus, the heterogeneity of transmission is a key parameter that regulates the long-term population dynamics of insects and their pathogens. We also show that both heterogeneity of transmission and life-history tradeoffs modulate characteristics of population dynamics such as the frequency and intensity of “boom–bust" population cycles. Furthermore, we show that because of life-history tradeoffs affecting the transmission rate, the use of multiple pathogen strains is more effective than the use of a single strain to control insect densities only when the pathogen strains differ considerably in their transmission characteristics. By quantifying the effects of ecology and evolution on population densities, we are able to offer recommendations to assess the long-term effects of classical biocontrol. View Full-Text
Keywords: transmission; heterogeneity; tradeoffs; fecundity; genetic variation; insect pathogens; population dynamics transmission; heterogeneity; tradeoffs; fecundity; genetic variation; insect pathogens; population dynamics
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Páez, D.J.; Fleming-Davies, A.E. Understanding the Evolutionary Ecology of host–pathogen Interactions Provides Insights into the Outcomes of Insect Pest Biocontrol. Viruses 2020, 12, 141.

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