Next Article in Journal
Packaging of Genomic RNA in Positive-Sense Single-Stranded RNA Viruses: A Complex Story
Previous Article in Journal
Hepatitis E virus (HEV)—The Future
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mastomys Species as Model Systems for Infectious Diseases
Open AccessReview

Recent Updates on Mouse Models for Human Immunodeficiency, Influenza, and Dengue Viral Infections

1
Department of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Central University of Tamilnadu, Tiruvarur 610 005, India
2
Dengue/Chikungunya Group, ICMR-National Institute of Virology, Pune 411001, India
3
Neuroscience Research Laboratory, Mr. & Mrs. Ko Chi-Ming Centre for Parkinson’s Disease Research, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong, HKSAR, China
4
Central University of Tamilnadu, Tiruvarur 610 005, India
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Authors contributed equally.
Viruses 2019, 11(3), 252; https://doi.org/10.3390/v11030252
Received: 14 January 2019 / Revised: 9 February 2019 / Accepted: 19 February 2019 / Published: 13 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Models for Viral Diseases)
Well-developed mouse models are important for understanding the pathogenesis and progression of immunological response to viral infections in humans. Moreover, to test vaccines, anti-viral drugs and therapeutic agents, mouse models are fundamental for preclinical investigations. Human viruses, however, seldom infect mice due to differences in the cellular receptors used by the viruses for entry, as well as in the innate immune responses in mice and humans. In other words, a species barrier exists when using mouse models for investigating human viral infections. Developing transgenic (Tg) mice models expressing the human genes coding for viral entry receptors and knock-out (KO) mice models devoid of components involved in the innate immune response have, to some extent, overcome this barrier. Humanized mouse models are a third approach, developed by engrafting functional human cells and tissues into immunodeficient mice. They are becoming indispensable for analyzing human viral diseases since they nearly recapitulate the human disease. These mouse models also serve to test the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral agents. This review provides an update on the Tg, KO, and humanized mouse models that are used in studies investigating the pathogenesis of three important human-specific viruses, namely human immunodeficiency (HIV) virus 1, influenza, and dengue. View Full-Text
Keywords: infectious diseases; human viruses; mouse models; knockout mice; transgenic mice; humanized mice; HIV; influenza; dengue infectious diseases; human viruses; mouse models; knockout mice; transgenic mice; humanized mice; HIV; influenza; dengue
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Krishnakumar, V.; Durairajan, S.S.K.; Alagarasu, K.; Li, M.; Dash, A.P. Recent Updates on Mouse Models for Human Immunodeficiency, Influenza, and Dengue Viral Infections. Viruses 2019, 11, 252. https://doi.org/10.3390/v11030252

AMA Style

Krishnakumar V, Durairajan SSK, Alagarasu K, Li M, Dash AP. Recent Updates on Mouse Models for Human Immunodeficiency, Influenza, and Dengue Viral Infections. Viruses. 2019; 11(3):252. https://doi.org/10.3390/v11030252

Chicago/Turabian Style

Krishnakumar, Vinodhini; Durairajan, Siva S.K.; Alagarasu, Kalichamy; Li, Min; Dash, Aditya P. 2019. "Recent Updates on Mouse Models for Human Immunodeficiency, Influenza, and Dengue Viral Infections" Viruses 11, no. 3: 252. https://doi.org/10.3390/v11030252

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop