Next Article in Journal
Interferon γ and α Have Differential Effects on SAMHD1, a Potent Antiviral Protein, in Feline Lymphocytes
Previous Article in Journal
Internal Ribosome Entry Site Dramatically Reduces Transgene Expression in Hematopoietic Cells in a Position-Dependent Manner
Open AccessArticle

Genetically Modified Rabies Virus Vector-Based Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine is Safe and Induces Efficacious Immune Responses in Mice

1
College of Wildlife and Protected Areas, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China
2
Changchun Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Changchun 130000, China
3
Comparative Medicine Center, Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) and Institute of Laboratory Animal Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS), Beijing 100021, China
4
Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130000, China
5
College of Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun 130062, China
6
Animal Science and Technology College, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun 130118, China
7
Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 20031, China
8
Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, Beijing 100071, China
9
CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Viruses 2019, 11(10), 919; https://doi.org/10.3390/v11100919
Received: 8 September 2019 / Revised: 29 September 2019 / Accepted: 30 September 2019 / Published: 8 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Antivirals & Vaccines)
Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which causes Rift Valley fever (RVF), is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. RVF is a World Health Organization (WHO) priority disease and, together with rabies, is a major health burden in Africa. Here, we present the development and characterization of an inactivated recombinant RVFV and rabies virus (RABV) vaccine candidate (rSRV9-eGn). Immunization with rSRV9-eGn stimulated the production of RVFV-specific IgG antibodies and induced humoral and cellular immunity in mice but did not induce the production of neutralizing antibodies. IgG1 and IgG2a were the main isotypes observed by IgG subtype detection, and IgG3 antibodies were not detected. The ratios of IgG1/IgG2a > 1 indicated a Type 2 humoral immune response. An effective vaccine is intended to establish a long-lived population of memory T cells, and mice generated memory cells among the proliferating T cell population after immunization with rSRV9-eGn, with effector memory T cells (TEM) as the major population. Due to the lack of prophylactic treatment experiments, it is impossible to predict whether this vaccine can protect animals from RVFV infection with only high titres of anti-RVFV IgG antibodies and no neutralizing antibodies induced, and thus, protection confirmation needs further verification. However, this RVFV vaccine designed with RABV as the vector provides ideas for the development of vaccines that prevent RVFV and RABV infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: Rift Valley fever virus; rabies virus; inactivated vaccine; RVFV-specific IgG antibodies; adjuvant Rift Valley fever virus; rabies virus; inactivated vaccine; RVFV-specific IgG antibodies; adjuvant
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, S.; Hao, M.; Feng, N.; Jin, H.; Yan, F.; Chi, H.; Wang, H.; Han, Q.; Wang, J.; Wong, G.; Liu, B.; Wu, J.; Bi, Y.; Wang, T.; Sun, W.; Gao, Y.; Yang, S.; Zhao, Y.; Xia, X. Genetically Modified Rabies Virus Vector-Based Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine is Safe and Induces Efficacious Immune Responses in Mice. Viruses 2019, 11, 919.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop