Next Article in Journal
Effects of Management Practices and Topography on Ectomycorrhizal Fungi of Maritime Pine during Seedling Recruitment
Next Article in Special Issue
Growth Response of Whitebark Pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm) Regeneration to Thinning and Prescribed Burn Treatments
Previous Article in Journal
Composition and Structure of Forest Fire Refugia: What Are the Ecosystem Legacies across Burned Landscapes?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Ten Years of Monitoring Illustrates a Cascade of Effects of White Pine Blister Rust and Focuses Whitebark Pine Restoration in the Canadian Rocky and Columbia Mountains
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Whitebark Pine in the Northern Cascades: Tracking the Effects of Blister Rust on Population Health in North Cascades National Park Service Complex and Mount Rainier National Park

1
North Cascades National Park Service Complex, 810 State Route 20, Sedro-Woolley, WA 98284, USA
2
Western Ecosystems Technology, Inc., Environmental & Statistical Consultants, 200 S. Second Street, Laramie, WY 82090, USA
3
National Park Service—North Coast & Cascades Network, Olympic National Park, 600 East Park Avenue, Port Angeles, WA 98362, USA
4
National Park Service—North Coast & Cascades Network, North Cascades National Park Service Complex, 810 State Route 20, Sedro-Woolley, WA 98284, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2018, 9(5), 244; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9050244
Received: 23 February 2018 / Revised: 21 April 2018 / Accepted: 26 April 2018 / Published: 3 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Restoration of Whitebark Pine)
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) is a key component of subalpine and alpine ecosystems in the northern Cascades. The species’ survival is threatened by white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, fire exclusion, and climate change. We monitored whitebark pine in permanent plots in two national parks three times between 2004 and 2016. The proportion of live trees showing evidence of blister rust infection increased in North Cascades National Park Service Complex from 32% in 2004 to 51% in 2016 and from 18% to 38% in Mount Rainier National Park. Mortality increased from 7% to 21% in North Cascades National Park Service Complex and 38% to 44% in Mount Rainier National Park. The percent of live infected and dead whitebark pine increased with south and east aspects and mortality decreased with elevation. Annualized mortality rates calculated for the entire study period were 1.5% in Mount Rainier National Park and 2.3% in North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Although these rates decreased between the first time period (2004–2009) and the second time period (2009–2016), the prevalence of infected and dead whitebark pine increased across all park landscapes over time and increased in smaller diameter whitebark pine trees. View Full-Text
Keywords: Pinus albicaulis; whitebark pine; blister rust; national park; subalpine; Cascades; mountain pine beetle Pinus albicaulis; whitebark pine; blister rust; national park; subalpine; Cascades; mountain pine beetle
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Rochefort, R.M.; Howlin, S.; Jeroue, L.; Boetsch, J.R.; Grace, L.P. Whitebark Pine in the Northern Cascades: Tracking the Effects of Blister Rust on Population Health in North Cascades National Park Service Complex and Mount Rainier National Park. Forests 2018, 9, 244.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop