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Open AccessArticle

Phytophthora cinnamomi Colonized Reclaimed Surface Mined Sites in Eastern Kentucky: Implications for the Restoration of Susceptible Species

1
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546, USA
2
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546, USA
3
USDA-Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Forest Health Research and Education Center, Lexington, KY 40546, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2018, 9(4), 203; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9040203
Received: 21 March 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 12 April 2018 / Published: 13 April 2018
Appalachian forests are threatened by a number of factors, especially introduced pests and pathogens. Among these is Phytophthora cinnamomi, a soil-borne oomycete pathogen known to cause root rot in American chestnut, shortleaf pine, and other native tree species. This study was initiated to characterize the incidence of P. cinnamomi on surface mined lands in eastern Kentucky, USA, representing a range of time since reclamation (10, 12, 15, and 20 years since reclamation). Incidence of P. cinnamomi was correlated to soil properties including overall soil development, as indicated by a variety of measured soil physical and chemical parameters, especially the accumulation of soil organic carbon. P. cinnamomi was detected in only two of the four sites studied, aged 15 and 20 years since reclamation. These sites were generally characterized by higher organic matter accumulation than the younger sites in which P. cinnamomi was not detected. These results demonstrate that P. cinnamomi is capable of colonizing reclaimed mine sites in Appalachia; additional research is necessary to determine the impact of P. cinnamomi on susceptible tree species at these sites. View Full-Text
Keywords: forest health; mine reclamation; Forestry Reclamation Approach; Phytophthora; ink disease; American chestnut forest health; mine reclamation; Forestry Reclamation Approach; Phytophthora; ink disease; American chestnut
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Sena, K.L.; Yeager, K.M.; Dreaden, T.J.; Barton, C.D. Phytophthora cinnamomi Colonized Reclaimed Surface Mined Sites in Eastern Kentucky: Implications for the Restoration of Susceptible Species. Forests 2018, 9, 203.

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