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Open AccessCommunication

Allowing Users to Benefit from Tree Shading: Using a Smartphone App to Allow Adaptive Route Planning during Extreme Heat

1
Centre for Urban Research, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia
2
Community Planning and Development, La Trobe University, Bendigo, VIC 3552, Australia
3
Urban Forester, City of Greater Bendigo, Bendigo, VIC 3552, Australia
4
Spatial Vision Innovations, 8/575 Bourke St, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(9), 998; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11090998
Received: 11 August 2020 / Revised: 14 September 2020 / Accepted: 15 September 2020 / Published: 17 September 2020
This paper presents the outcomes from a joint research project that aims to develop a smartphone application/online platform to model the most thermally comfortable active transport route to a planned destination using heat information and tree shading (Shadeway). Here, we provide a summary of our systematic review of academic literature and applications from the Google Play and Apple App Store, to identify current knowledge about personal adaptation strategies when navigating travel in cities during high temperatures. The review identifies that there is a lack of attention regarding the use of smartphone applications to address urban thermal comfort for active transport by government and private industry. We then present the initial results of original research from three community focus groups and an online survey that elicited participants’ opinions about Shadeways in the City of Greater Bendigo (CoGB), Australia. The results clearly show the need for better management of Shadeways in CoGB. For example, 52.3% of the routes traveled by participants suffer from either no or poor levels of shading, and 53 of the shaded areas were located along routes that also experience heavy traffic, which can have an adverse effect on perceptions and actual safety. It is expected that this study will contribute to improve understanding of the methods used to identify adaptation strategies to increasingly extreme temperatures. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban heat; Shadeway; tree shading; build shading; smartphone apps; route mapping; thermal comfort urban heat; Shadeway; tree shading; build shading; smartphone apps; route mapping; thermal comfort
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MDPI and ACS Style

Deilami, K.; Rudner, J.; Butt, A.; MacLeod, T.; Williams, G.; Romeijn, H.; Amati, M. Allowing Users to Benefit from Tree Shading: Using a Smartphone App to Allow Adaptive Route Planning during Extreme Heat. Forests 2020, 11, 998. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11090998

AMA Style

Deilami K, Rudner J, Butt A, MacLeod T, Williams G, Romeijn H, Amati M. Allowing Users to Benefit from Tree Shading: Using a Smartphone App to Allow Adaptive Route Planning during Extreme Heat. Forests. 2020; 11(9):998. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11090998

Chicago/Turabian Style

Deilami, Kaveh; Rudner, Julie; Butt, Andrew; MacLeod, Tania; Williams, Geoff; Romeijn, Harmen; Amati, Marco. 2020. "Allowing Users to Benefit from Tree Shading: Using a Smartphone App to Allow Adaptive Route Planning during Extreme Heat" Forests 11, no. 9: 998. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11090998

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