Next Article in Journal
Assessing Post-Harvest Regeneration in Northern Hardwood and Mixedwood Stands: Evolution of Species Composition and Dominance within 15-Year-Old Group Selection and Patch Cutting
Next Article in Special Issue
Moose Browsing Tends Spruce Plantations More Efficiently Than a Single Mechanical Release
Previous Article in Journal
Surface Canopy Position Determines the Photosystem II Photochemistry in Invasive and Native Prosopis Congeners at Sharjah Desert, UAE
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effects of Mechanical Site Preparation on Microsite Availability and Growth of Planted Black Spruce in Canadian Paludified Forests
Open AccessArticle

Natural Regeneration Following Partial and Clear-Cut Harvesting in Mature Aspen-Jack Pine Stands in Eastern Canada

Institut de recherche sur les forêts, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 boul. de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(7), 741; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11070741
Received: 10 June 2020 / Revised: 26 June 2020 / Accepted: 30 June 2020 / Published: 8 July 2020
Over the last three decades, the ecological basis for the generalized use of even-aged silviculture in boreal forests has been increasingly challenged. In boreal mixed-wood landscapes, the diminishing proportion of conifers, to the benefit of intolerant hardwoods, has been a primary concern, coupled with the general rarefication of old-growth conifer-dominated stands. In this context, partial cutting, extended rotations and forest renewal techniques that eliminate or reduce regenerating hardwoods have been proposed as means of regaining greater conifer cover. As a result, experimentation and industrial application of various forms of both variable retention and partial harvesting are occurring across the commercial Canadian boreal forest. In this study, we compared the effects of two harvesting intensities, clearcutting and low-intensity partial cutting (removal of 25–31% of tree basal area), on hardwood and conifer regeneration levels 7–19 years following treatments in aspen (Populus tremuloides)-dominated stands and verified whether regeneration differences existed between micro-sites on and off machinery trails. The abundance of aspen regeneration increased with percent basal area removal and was positively correlated to the abundance of mature aspen prior to harvesting. The abundance of fir (Abies balsamea) regeneration after partial cutting was similar to controls and higher than after clear-cutting and was positively correlated with ground cover of mixed litter (i.e., mixture of needles and leaves) and negatively correlated with ground cover of broadleaf litter. These results suggest that it is possible in boreal mixed-woods to control aspen abundance and promote or maintain conifer regeneration through silvicultural treatments that limit canopy opening and promote mixed forest floor litter. View Full-Text
Keywords: balsam fir; soil disturbance; seedling; sapling abundance; height growth; substrate balsam fir; soil disturbance; seedling; sapling abundance; height growth; substrate
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Maleki, K.; Nguema Allogo, F.; Lafleur, B. Natural Regeneration Following Partial and Clear-Cut Harvesting in Mature Aspen-Jack Pine Stands in Eastern Canada. Forests 2020, 11, 741. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11070741

AMA Style

Maleki K, Nguema Allogo F, Lafleur B. Natural Regeneration Following Partial and Clear-Cut Harvesting in Mature Aspen-Jack Pine Stands in Eastern Canada. Forests. 2020; 11(7):741. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11070741

Chicago/Turabian Style

Maleki, Kobra; Nguema Allogo, Freddy; Lafleur, Benoit. 2020. "Natural Regeneration Following Partial and Clear-Cut Harvesting in Mature Aspen-Jack Pine Stands in Eastern Canada" Forests 11, no. 7: 741. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11070741

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop