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Open AccessArticle

Land Use and Access in Protected Areas: A Hunter’s View of Flexibility

1
Anthropology Research Team, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, P.O. Box 122, FI-96101 Rovaniemi, Finland
2
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Buea, Buea P.O. Box 63, South West Region, Cameroon
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(4), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11040481
Received: 19 March 2020 / Revised: 17 April 2020 / Accepted: 20 April 2020 / Published: 24 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protected Areas in Forest Conservation: Challenges and Opportunities)
Anthropologists sometimes ask what flexible practices mean when used in instances of land use and access among protected area regimes which control the land and the indigenous or local people who claim rights to the land. In the Mount Cameroon National Park (MCNP), West Africa, this question comes with urgency because of the historical disputes associated with defining access and user-rights to land within this park. In this case, we present an ethnographic study using a transect walk with a native Bakweri hunter to map and analyze his opinions about land use and access into the park. The findings show that, despite State prohibitions for this park, customary practices still occur for mutual reasons, whereas, in situations of disputes, other practices continue on the land unnoticed. We conclude that this flexibility is indicative of reciprocal negotiations and cultural resilience that preserve not only the biodiversity of the park but also the culturally relevant needs of people. View Full-Text
Keywords: anthropology; land use and access; flexibility; Bakweri; Mount Cameroon National Park; protected areas; conservation anthropology; land use and access; flexibility; Bakweri; Mount Cameroon National Park; protected areas; conservation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Akonwi Nebasifu, A.; Majory Atong, N. Land Use and Access in Protected Areas: A Hunter’s View of Flexibility. Forests 2020, 11, 481. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11040481

AMA Style

Akonwi Nebasifu A, Majory Atong N. Land Use and Access in Protected Areas: A Hunter’s View of Flexibility. Forests. 2020; 11(4):481. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11040481

Chicago/Turabian Style

Akonwi Nebasifu, Ayonghe; Majory Atong, Ngoindong. 2020. "Land Use and Access in Protected Areas: A Hunter’s View of Flexibility" Forests 11, no. 4: 481. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11040481

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