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The Risk of Bark and Ambrosia Beetles Associated with Imported Non-Coniferous Wood and Potential Horizontal Phytosanitary Measures

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European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization, 75011 Paris, France
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SpELL, Université libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Bruxelles, Belgium
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INRAE, University of Bordeaux, BIOGECO, 33610 Cestas, France
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DAFNAE, University of Padova, Agripolis, 35020 Legnaro, Italy
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Administration of the Republic of Slovenia for Food Safety, Veterinary Sector and Plant Health, Ljubljana, SI 1000, Slovenia
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Department of Forest Protection and Wildlife Management, University of Zagreb Faculty of Forestry, Zagreb, HR 10000, Croatia
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School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
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Forest Research, Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey, GU10 4LH, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Members of the EPPO Expert Working Group on bark and ambrosia beetles associated with non-coniferous wood.
Forests 2020, 11(3), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030342
Received: 12 February 2020 / Revised: 13 March 2020 / Accepted: 18 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Wood Science)
Many bark and ambrosia beetle species (Coleoptera: Scolytinae and Platypodinae) are known to have spread worldwide in relation to international trade. Concerns have been expressed within the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO) about recent introductions of non-indigenous species of these groups. Regulation of the non-coniferous wood trade into many EPPO member countries is currently not sufficient to cover such risks. In 2018–2019, an EPPO study on the risk of bark and ambrosia beetles associated with imported non-coniferous wood was carried out, and the key characteristics contributing to the pest risk from introduced species were determined using expert consensus. This paper summarizes the key findings of the study, which are available in full detail on the EPPO website. The study identified biological and other risk factors and illustrated them with examples from 26 beetle species or groups of species known to be invasive or posing a threat to plant health. These representative species were classified into three categories based on known damage and level of uncertainty. In the present article, factorial discriminant analyses were used to identify features of bark and ambrosia beetle biology associated with damage caused and invasiveness. Based on the information assembled and consideration of the risk factors, it was recommended that in order to prevent the introduction of new bark and ambrosia beetles via non-coniferous wood commodities, horizontal phytosanitary measures should be adopted, irrespective of the host plant species and the origin (i.e., for all genera of non-coniferous woody plants and from all origins). Phytosanitary measures are presented here for various wood commodities. View Full-Text
Keywords: Scolytinae; Platypodinae; quarantine; pest risk; biosecurity; invasive species; plant health Scolytinae; Platypodinae; quarantine; pest risk; biosecurity; invasive species; plant health
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Grousset, F.; Grégoire, J.-C.; Jactel, H.; Battisti, A.; Benko Beloglavec, A.; Hrašovec, B.; Hulcr, J.; Inward, D.; Orlinski, A.; Petter, F. The Risk of Bark and Ambrosia Beetles Associated with Imported Non-Coniferous Wood and Potential Horizontal Phytosanitary Measures. Forests 2020, 11, 342.

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