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Comprehensive Accounting for REDD+ Programs: A Pragmatic Approach as Exemplified in Guyana

1
Winrock International, Arlington, VA 22202, USA
2
Guyana Forestry Commission, Georgetown, Guyana
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(12), 1265; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11121265
Received: 19 October 2020 / Revised: 21 November 2020 / Accepted: 24 November 2020 / Published: 27 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue REDD+: Protecting Climate, Forests and Livelihoods)
Completeness is an important element for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) accounting to ensure transparency and accountability. However, including a full accounting for all emission sources in a REDD+ program is often resource-intensive and cost-prohibitive, especially considering that some emission sources comprise far less than 10% of total emissions and are thus considered insignificant according to Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidance. This is evident in forest reference emission level (FREL)/forest reference level (FRL) submissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Of the 50 countries that have submitted FRELs to date, only half of them include degradation in their FRELs even though degradation is often a significant source of emissions. Half of the countries that do include degradation use satellite imagery without necessarily specifying degrading activities or separating anthropogenic activities. Guyana provides an example of an approach that enables inclusion of all emission sources while considering the significance of each when developing an accounting approach. Since submitting its FREL in 2014, Guyana has made stepwise improvements to its emission estimates so that the country is now able to report on all deforestation and degradation activities resulting in emissions, whether significant or not. Based on the example of Guyana’s efforts, the authors recommend a simple approach to move towards complete accounting in a cost-effective manner. This approach can be scaled to other countries with other activities that results in greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. Such complete accounting allows for higher accountability in REDD+ systems and can lead to greater effectiveness in reducing emissions. View Full-Text
Keywords: REDD+, greenhouse gases; emissions accounting; deforestation; forest degradation REDD+, greenhouse gases; emissions accounting; deforestation; forest degradation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goslee, K.M.; Pearson, T.R.H.; Bernal, B.; Simon, S.L.; Sukhdeo, H. Comprehensive Accounting for REDD+ Programs: A Pragmatic Approach as Exemplified in Guyana. Forests 2020, 11, 1265. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11121265

AMA Style

Goslee KM, Pearson TRH, Bernal B, Simon SL, Sukhdeo H. Comprehensive Accounting for REDD+ Programs: A Pragmatic Approach as Exemplified in Guyana. Forests. 2020; 11(12):1265. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11121265

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goslee, Katherine M., Timothy R.H. Pearson, Blanca Bernal, Sophia L. Simon, and Hansrajie Sukhdeo. 2020. "Comprehensive Accounting for REDD+ Programs: A Pragmatic Approach as Exemplified in Guyana" Forests 11, no. 12: 1265. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11121265

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