Next Article in Journal
Nitrogen Addition Affects Soil Respiration Primarily through Changes in Microbial Community Structure and Biomass in a Subtropical Natural Forest
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluation of Forest Conversion Effects on Soil Erosion, Soil Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen Based on 137Cs Tracer Technique
Previous Article in Special Issue
Diversity and Distribution of Phytophthora Species in Protected Natural Areas in Sicily
Open AccessArticle

Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora gonapodyides Differently Colonize and Contribute to the Decomposition of Green and Senesced Umbellularia californica Leaves in a Simulated Stream Environment

Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, One Shields Drive, Davis, CA 95616, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(5), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10050434
Received: 28 March 2019 / Revised: 18 May 2019 / Accepted: 19 May 2019 / Published: 20 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phytophthora Infestations in Forest Ecosystems)
Plant pathogenic as well as saprotrophic Phytophthora species are now known to inhabit forest streams and other surface waters. How they survive and function in aquatic ecosystems, however, remains largely uninvestigated. Phytophthora ramorum, an invasive pathogen in California forests, regularly occurs in forest streams, where it can colonize green leaves shed in the stream but is quickly and largely succeeded by saprotrophically competent clade 6 Phytophthora species, such as Phytophthora gonapodyides. We investigated, using controlled environment experiments, whether leaf litter quality, based on senescence, affects how P. ramorum and P. gonapodyides compete in leaf colonization and to what extent each species can contribute to leaf decomposition. We found that both Phytophthora species effectively colonized and persisted on green or yellow (senescing) bay leaves, but only P. gonapodyides could also colonize and persist on brown (fully senesced and dried) leaves. Both Phytophthora species similarly accelerated the decomposition of green leaves and yellow leaves compared with non-inoculated controls, but colonization of brown leaves by P. gonapodyides did not affect their decomposition rate. View Full-Text
Keywords: leaf decay; oomycetes; invasive species; aquatic fungi; trophic specialization; saprotroph; pathogen; parasite leaf decay; oomycetes; invasive species; aquatic fungi; trophic specialization; saprotroph; pathogen; parasite
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Aram, K.; Rizzo, D.M. Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora gonapodyides Differently Colonize and Contribute to the Decomposition of Green and Senesced Umbellularia californica Leaves in a Simulated Stream Environment. Forests 2019, 10, 434.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop