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Leaf Enzyme and Plant Productivity Responses to Environmental Stress Associated with Sea Level Rise in Two Asian Mangrove Species

Institute of Tropiccal Agriculture and Forestry, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China
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Forests 2019, 10(3), 250; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10030250
Received: 31 January 2019 / Revised: 4 March 2019 / Accepted: 4 March 2019 / Published: 12 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecophysiology and Biology)
As the only forests situated at the transition between land and sea, mangrove forests are one of the first ecosystems vulnerable to rising sea levels. When the sea level rises, plants are exposed to increased salinity, as well as tidal flooding. The responses of mangrove forests to changing sea levels depend on the synergistic effects of tidal flooding and salinity on plants, especially seedlings. The focus of this paper is to assess the ability of different tide position on mangrove Aegiceras corniculatum (A. corniculatum) and Bruguiera sexangula (B. sexangula) seedlings to withstand tidal flooding and seawater salinity, and to investigate the effects of tidal flooding and salinity on plant growth. To accomplish this, a controlled experiment was initiated to examine the synergistic effects of tidal flooding and salinity on the growth and physiology of A. corniculatum and B. sexangula seedlings subjected to four tidal flooding times and four levels of salinity over a course of six months. The results showed that the biomass and antioxidant enzymes of A. corniculatum and B. sexangula seedlings were significantly affected by the increase in salinity and flooding time. Changes in biomass, SOD, and CAT activity of A. corniculatum seedlings show that they are more adapted to grow in an environment with high salinity and long flooding time than B. sexangula. Our results show that species growing in middle- to low-tide levels were better adapted to sea level rise than those growing at high-tide levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aegiceras corniculatum; Bruguiera sexangula; ecophysiological response; sea level rise; seedlings; salinity; flooding time Aegiceras corniculatum; Bruguiera sexangula; ecophysiological response; sea level rise; seedlings; salinity; flooding time
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Lv, X.; Li, D.; Yang, X.; Zhang, M.; Deng, Q. Leaf Enzyme and Plant Productivity Responses to Environmental Stress Associated with Sea Level Rise in Two Asian Mangrove Species. Forests 2019, 10, 250.

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