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Article

An 18-Month Analysis of Bond Strength of Hot-Dip Galvanized Reinforcing Steel B500SP and S235JR+AR to Chloride Contaminated Concrete

Faculty of Civil Engineering, Silesian University of Technology, 5 Akademicka, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Luigi Coppola
Materials 2021, 14(4), 747; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14040747
Received: 31 December 2020 / Revised: 27 January 2021 / Accepted: 29 January 2021 / Published: 5 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion in Concrete: Inhibitors and Coatings)
This article describes the comparative analysis of tests on bond strength of hot-dip galvanized and black steel to concrete with and without chlorides. The bond effect was evaluated with six research methods: strength, electrochemical (measurements of potential, EIS and LPR), optical, and 3D scanning. The tests were conducted within a long period of 18 months on 48 test elements reinforced with smooth rebars ϕ8 mm from steel grade S235JR+AR and ribbed rebars ϕ8 mm and ϕ16 mm from steel grade B500SP. The main strength tests on the reinforcement bond to concrete were used to compare forces pulling out galvanized and black steel rebars from concrete. This comparative analysis was performed after 28, 180, and 540 days from the preparation of the elements. The electrochemical tests were performed to evaluate corrosion of steel rebars in concrete, particularly in chloride contaminated concrete. The behaviour of concrete elements while pulling out the rebar was observed using the system of digital cameras during the optical tests. As regards 3D scanning of ribbed rebars ϕ8 mm and ϕ16 mm, this method allowed the detailed identification of their complex geometry in terms of determining the polarization area to evaluate the corrosion rate of reinforcement in concrete. The test results indicated that the presence of zinc coating on rebars had an impact on the parameters of anchorage. In the case of ribbed rebars of 16 mm in diameter, the maximum values of adhesive stress and bond stiffness were reduced over time when compared to black steel rebars. Moreover, it was noticed that the stiffness of rebar anchorage in chloride contaminated concrete was considerably higher than in concrete without chlorides. View Full-Text
Keywords: concrete; reinforcing steel; bond strength; zinc coating; HDG; corrosion; chlorides; pullout; EIS; LPR; optical measurements; 3D scanning concrete; reinforcing steel; bond strength; zinc coating; HDG; corrosion; chlorides; pullout; EIS; LPR; optical measurements; 3D scanning
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jaśniok, M.; Kołodziej, J.; Gromysz, K. An 18-Month Analysis of Bond Strength of Hot-Dip Galvanized Reinforcing Steel B500SP and S235JR+AR to Chloride Contaminated Concrete. Materials 2021, 14, 747. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14040747

AMA Style

Jaśniok M, Kołodziej J, Gromysz K. An 18-Month Analysis of Bond Strength of Hot-Dip Galvanized Reinforcing Steel B500SP and S235JR+AR to Chloride Contaminated Concrete. Materials. 2021; 14(4):747. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14040747

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jaśniok, Mariusz, Jacek Kołodziej, and Krzysztof Gromysz. 2021. "An 18-Month Analysis of Bond Strength of Hot-Dip Galvanized Reinforcing Steel B500SP and S235JR+AR to Chloride Contaminated Concrete" Materials 14, no. 4: 747. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14040747

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