Next Article in Journal
The Design of a Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectrometer Attachment for Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy
Previous Article in Journal
Ultra-Short Laser Surface Properties Optimization of Biocompatibility Characteristics of 3D Poly-ε-Caprolactone and Hydroxyapatite Composite Scaffolds
 
 
Article

Creep and Shrinkage Behaviour of Disintegrated and Non-Disintegrated Cement Mortar

1
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Riga Technical University, Kalku 1, LV-1658 Riga, Latvia
2
Faculty of Materials Engineering and Physics, Cracow University of Technology, Al. Jana Pawła II 37, 31-864 Kraków, Poland
3
Research Institute in Civil and Mechanical Engineering GeM—UMR CNRS 6183, 58, Nantes University—IUT Saint-Nazaire, Rue Michel Ange, 44 600 Saint Nazaire, France
4
Department of Engineering and Technology, Catholic University of Uruguay, Av. 8 de Octubre 2738, Montevideo 11600, Uruguay
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sagrario Martínez-Ramírez
Materials 2021, 14(24), 7510; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14247510
Received: 18 October 2021 / Revised: 30 November 2021 / Accepted: 2 December 2021 / Published: 7 December 2021
One way to prevent cement from ending up in landfills after its shelf life is to regain its activity and reuse it as a binder. As has been discovered, milling by planetary ball mill is not effective. Grinding by collision is considered a more efficient way to refine brittle material and, in the case of cement, to regain its activity. There has been considerable research regarding the partial replacement of cement using disintegrated cement in mortar or concrete in the past few decades. This article determines and compares the creep and shrinkage properties of cement mortar specimens made from old disintegrated, old non-disintegrated, and new non-disintegrated Portland cement. The tests show that the creep strains for old disintegrated and old non-disintegrated cement mortars are close, within a 2% margin of each other. However, the creep strains for new non-disintegrated cement mortar are 30% lower. Shrinkage for old disintegrated and non-disintegrated cement mortar is 20% lower than for new non-disintegrated cement mortar. The research shows that disintegration is a viable procedure to make old cement suitable for structural application from a long-term property standpoint. Additionally, it increases cement mortar compressive strength by 49% if the cement is disintegrated together with sand. View Full-Text
Keywords: creep; shrinkage; long-term properties; disintegrated cement; non-disintegrated cement creep; shrinkage; long-term properties; disintegrated cement; non-disintegrated cement
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gailitis, R.; Figiela, B.; Abelkalns, K.; Sprince, A.; Sahmenko, G.; Choinska, M.; Guigou, M.D. Creep and Shrinkage Behaviour of Disintegrated and Non-Disintegrated Cement Mortar. Materials 2021, 14, 7510. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14247510

AMA Style

Gailitis R, Figiela B, Abelkalns K, Sprince A, Sahmenko G, Choinska M, Guigou MD. Creep and Shrinkage Behaviour of Disintegrated and Non-Disintegrated Cement Mortar. Materials. 2021; 14(24):7510. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14247510

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gailitis, Rihards, Beata Figiela, Kalvis Abelkalns, Andina Sprince, Genadijs Sahmenko, Marta Choinska, and Martin Duarte Guigou. 2021. "Creep and Shrinkage Behaviour of Disintegrated and Non-Disintegrated Cement Mortar" Materials 14, no. 24: 7510. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14247510

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop