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Article

In Vivo Deformation and Strain Measurements in Human Bone Using Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) and 3T Clinical MRI

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
2
Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
3
Fortius Clinic, 17 Fitzhardinge St, London W1H 6EQ, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(23), 5354; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235354
Received: 25 October 2020 / Revised: 20 November 2020 / Accepted: 23 November 2020 / Published: 25 November 2020
Strains within bone play an important role in the remodelling process and the mechanisms of fracture. The ability to assess these strains in vivo can provide clinically relevant information regarding bone health, injury risk, and can also be used to optimise treatments. In vivo bone strains have been investigated using multiple experimental techniques, but none have quantified 3D strains using non-invasive techniques. Digital volume correlation based on clinical MRI (DVC-MRI) is a non-invasive technique that has the potential to achieve this. However, before it can be implemented, uncertainties associated with the measurements must be quantified. Here, DVC-MRI was evaluated to assess its potential to measure in vivo strains in the talus. A zero-strain test (two repeated unloaded scans) was conducted using three MRI sequences, and three DVC approaches to quantify errors and to establish optimal settings. With optimal settings, strains could be measured with a precision of 200 με and accuracy of 480 με for a spatial resolution of 7.5 mm, and a precision of 133 με and accuracy of 251 με for a spatial resolution of 10 mm. These results demonstrate that this technique has the potential to measure relevant levels of in vivo bone strain and to be used for a range of clinical applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: digital volume correlation; DVC; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); ankle; bone; strain digital volume correlation; DVC; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); ankle; bone; strain
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tavana, S.; N. Clark, J.; Newell, N.; Calder, J.D.; Hansen, U. In Vivo Deformation and Strain Measurements in Human Bone Using Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) and 3T Clinical MRI. Materials 2020, 13, 5354. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235354

AMA Style

Tavana S, N. Clark J, Newell N, Calder JD, Hansen U. In Vivo Deformation and Strain Measurements in Human Bone Using Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) and 3T Clinical MRI. Materials. 2020; 13(23):5354. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235354

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tavana, Saman, Jeffrey N. Clark, Nicolas Newell, James D. Calder, and Ulrich Hansen. 2020. "In Vivo Deformation and Strain Measurements in Human Bone Using Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) and 3T Clinical MRI" Materials 13, no. 23: 5354. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235354

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