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Article

Effect of the Drying Method of Pine and Beech Wood on Fracture Toughness and Shear Yield Stress

1
Department of Manufacturing and Production Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gdańsk University of Technology, Gabriela Narutowicza Street 11/12, 80233 Gdańsk, Poland
2
InnoRenew CoE, Livade 6, 6310 Izola, Slovenia
3
Andrej Marušič Institute, University of Primorska, Muzejski trg 2, 6000 Koper, Slovenia
4
HS Hydromech, Wybickiego 21, 83050 Lublewo Gdańskie, Poland
5
The Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80231 Gdansk, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(20), 4692; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204692
Received: 23 September 2020 / Revised: 16 October 2020 / Accepted: 19 October 2020 / Published: 21 October 2020
The modern wood converting processes consists of several stages and material drying belongs to the most influencing future performances of products. The procedure of drying wood is usually realized between subsequent sawing operations, affecting significantly cutting conditions and general properties of material. An alternative methodology for determination of mechanical properties (fracture toughness and shear yield stress) based on cutting process analysis is presented here. Two wood species (pine and beech) representing soft and hard woods were investigated with respect to four diverse drying methods used in industry. Fracture toughness and shear yield stress were determined directly from the cutting power signal that was recorded while frame sawing. An original procedure for compensation of the wood density variation is proposed to generalize mechanical properties of wood and allow direct comparison between species and drying methods. Noticeable differences of fracture toughness and shear yield stress values were found among all drying techniques and for both species, but only for beech wood the differences were statistically significant. These observations provide a new highlight on the understanding of the effect of thermo-hydro modification of wood on mechanical performance of structures. It can be also highly useful to optimize woodworking machines by properly adjusting cutting power requirements. View Full-Text
Keywords: cutting process; sawing process; cutting power; fracture toughness; drying process; pine wood; beech wood; shear yield stress cutting process; sawing process; cutting power; fracture toughness; drying process; pine wood; beech wood; shear yield stress
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chuchala, D.; Sandak, J.; Orlowski, K.A.; Muzinski, T.; Lackowski, M.; Ochrymiuk, T. Effect of the Drying Method of Pine and Beech Wood on Fracture Toughness and Shear Yield Stress. Materials 2020, 13, 4692. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204692

AMA Style

Chuchala D, Sandak J, Orlowski KA, Muzinski T, Lackowski M, Ochrymiuk T. Effect of the Drying Method of Pine and Beech Wood on Fracture Toughness and Shear Yield Stress. Materials. 2020; 13(20):4692. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204692

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chuchala, Daniel, Jakub Sandak, Kazimierz A. Orlowski, Tomasz Muzinski, Marcin Lackowski, and Tomasz Ochrymiuk. 2020. "Effect of the Drying Method of Pine and Beech Wood on Fracture Toughness and Shear Yield Stress" Materials 13, no. 20: 4692. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204692

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