Next Article in Journal
Strategies for Improving Antimicrobial Properties of Stainless Steel
Previous Article in Journal
On the Seismic Performance of Autoclaved Aerated Concrete Self-Insulation Block Walls
Open AccessArticle

Influence of Controlled Cooling on Crystallinity of Poly(L-Lactic Acid) Scaffolds after Hydrolytic Degradation

1
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Monterrey 64849, Mexico
2
Laboratorio Nacional de Manufactura Aditiva y Digital (MADIT), Apodaca 66629, Mexico
3
Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto de Biotecnología, Ave. Pedro de Alba S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza 66455, Mexico
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(13), 2943; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13132943
Received: 23 May 2020 / Revised: 11 June 2020 / Accepted: 23 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Additive Manufacturing (AM) of Biomaterials)
The use of hybrid manufacturing to produce bimodal scaffolds has represented a great advancement in tissue engineering. These scaffolds provide a favorable environment in which cells can adhere and produce new tissue. However, there are several areas of opportunity to manufacture structures that provide enough strength and rigidity, while also improving chemical integrity. As an advancement in the manufacturing process of scaffolds, a cooling system was introduced in a fused deposition modeling (FDM) machine to vary the temperature on the printing bed. Two groups of polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were then printed at two different bed temperatures. The rate of degradation was evaluated during eight weeks in Hank’s Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) in a controlled environment (37 °C–120 rpm) to assess crystallinity. Results showed the influence of the cooling system on the degradation rate of printed scaffolds after the immersion period. This phenomenon was attributable to the mechanism associated with alkaline hydrolysis, where a higher degree of crystallinity obtained in one group induced greater rates of mass loss. The overall crystallinity was observed, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, to increase with time because of the erosion of some amorphous parts after immersion. View Full-Text
Keywords: polymer crystallinity; bimodal scaffolds; fused deposition modeling; hybrid manufacturing; additive manufacturing polymer crystallinity; bimodal scaffolds; fused deposition modeling; hybrid manufacturing; additive manufacturing
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vazquez-Armendariz, J.; Tejeda-Alejandre, R.; Rodriguez-Garcia, A.; Vega-Cantu, Y.I.; Mendoza-Buenrostro, C.; Rodriguez, C.A. Influence of Controlled Cooling on Crystallinity of Poly(L-Lactic Acid) Scaffolds after Hydrolytic Degradation. Materials 2020, 13, 2943.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop