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Erratum

Erratum: Hans, A.; Schmidt, P.; Ozga, C.; Hartmann, G.; Holzapfel, X.; Ehresmann, A.; Knie, A. Extreme Ultraviolet to Visible Dispersed Single Photon Detection for Highly Sensitive Sensing of Fundamental Processes in Diverse Samples. Materials 2018, 11, 869

MDPI, St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
Materials 2019, 12(1), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12010066
Submission received: 9 November 2018 / Accepted: 26 November 2018 / Published: 25 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Sensors for Selective Detection)
The editorial office of Materials would like to make the following changes to the published paper by Hans [1]. The content between Figure 3 and the title 2.4. Time-Resolved Detection of the published paper is duplicated. Please delete it.
The correct content is provided below:
Figure 3. Operation principle and signal processing of the three used anode types. (a) Wedge and strip anode: the position information is entailed in the amount of charge reaching the anode, i.e., the signal is processed through preamplifiers and integrating amplifiers and read out by an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The shown coordinate system demonstrates the orientation of the x- and y-axis and is valid for all anode types; (b) delay line anode: the position is determined from signal delay times, the pulses are processed by fast amplifiers and read out by a time-to-digital converter (TDC); (c) resistive anode: the position is determined from signal heights at four anode edges at 45° with respect to the coordinate axes. Here, the signals are processed through amplifiers and a position computer and read out by an ADC.
2.4. Time-Resolved Detection
We apologize for any inconvenience caused to the readers by these changes. The changes do not affect the scholarly results.

Reference

  1. Hans, A.; Schmidt, P.; Ozga, C.; Hartmann, G.; Holzapfel, X.; Ehresmann, A.; Knie, A. Extreme Ultraviolet to Visible Dispersed Single Photon Detection for Highly Sensitive Sensing of Fundamental Processes in Diverse Samples. Materials 2018, 11, 869. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]

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MDPI and ACS Style

Materials Editorial Office. Erratum: Hans, A.; Schmidt, P.; Ozga, C.; Hartmann, G.; Holzapfel, X.; Ehresmann, A.; Knie, A. Extreme Ultraviolet to Visible Dispersed Single Photon Detection for Highly Sensitive Sensing of Fundamental Processes in Diverse Samples. Materials 2018, 11, 869. Materials 2019, 12, 66. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12010066

AMA Style

Materials Editorial Office. Erratum: Hans, A.; Schmidt, P.; Ozga, C.; Hartmann, G.; Holzapfel, X.; Ehresmann, A.; Knie, A. Extreme Ultraviolet to Visible Dispersed Single Photon Detection for Highly Sensitive Sensing of Fundamental Processes in Diverse Samples. Materials 2018, 11, 869. Materials. 2019; 12(1):66. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12010066

Chicago/Turabian Style

Materials Editorial Office. 2019. "Erratum: Hans, A.; Schmidt, P.; Ozga, C.; Hartmann, G.; Holzapfel, X.; Ehresmann, A.; Knie, A. Extreme Ultraviolet to Visible Dispersed Single Photon Detection for Highly Sensitive Sensing of Fundamental Processes in Diverse Samples. Materials 2018, 11, 869" Materials 12, no. 1: 66. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12010066

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