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Article

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion—Flexible Enabling Technology for Variable Renewable Energy Integration in the Caribbean

1
Climate Analytics, Ritterstr. 3, 10969 Berlin, Germany
2
Hanley Sustainability Institute, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469, USA
3
Renewable and Clean Energy Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469, USA
4
Physics Department, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469, USA
5
Department of Engineering, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, UK
6
Department of Physics, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vengatesan Venugopal
Energies 2021, 14(8), 2192; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14082192
Received: 24 February 2021 / Revised: 25 March 2021 / Accepted: 12 April 2021 / Published: 14 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from The 8th International OTEC Symposium)
Many Caribbean island nations have historically been heavily dependent on imported fossil fuels for both power and transportation, while at the same time being at an enhanced risk from the impacts of climate change, although their emissions represent a very tiny fraction of the global total responsible for climate change. Small island developing states (SIDSs) are among the leaders in advocating for the ambitious 1.5 °C Paris Agreement target and the transition to 100% sustainable, renewable energy systems. In this work, three central results are presented. First, through GIS mapping of all Caribbean islands, the potential for near-coastal deep-water as a resource for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is shown, and these results are coupled with an estimate of the countries for which OTEC would be most advantageous due to a lack of other dispatchable renewable power options. Secondly, hourly data have been utilized to explicitly show the trade-offs between battery storage needs and dispatchable renewable sources such as OTEC in 100% renewable electricity systems, both in technological and economic terms. Finally, the utility of near-shore, open-cycle OTEC with accompanying desalination is shown to enable a higher penetration of renewable energy and lead to lower system levelized costs than those of a conventional fossil fuel system. View Full-Text
Keywords: ocean thermal energy conversion; OTEC; seawater air conditioning; SWAC; desalination; variable renewable energy; wind power; solar PV; 100% renewable energy; Caribbean ocean thermal energy conversion; OTEC; seawater air conditioning; SWAC; desalination; variable renewable energy; wind power; solar PV; 100% renewable energy; Caribbean
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brecha, R.J.; Schoenenberger, K.; Ashtine, M.; Koon Koon, R. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion—Flexible Enabling Technology for Variable Renewable Energy Integration in the Caribbean. Energies 2021, 14, 2192. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14082192

AMA Style

Brecha RJ, Schoenenberger K, Ashtine M, Koon Koon R. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion—Flexible Enabling Technology for Variable Renewable Energy Integration in the Caribbean. Energies. 2021; 14(8):2192. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14082192

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brecha, Robert J., Katherine Schoenenberger, Masaō Ashtine, and Randy Koon Koon. 2021. "Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion—Flexible Enabling Technology for Variable Renewable Energy Integration in the Caribbean" Energies 14, no. 8: 2192. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14082192

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