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Article

Pandemic of Childhood Myopia. Could New Indoor LED Lighting Be Part of the Solution?

1
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Campus Montepríncipe, Universidad San Pablo CEU, 28668 Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
2
Arquitecture and Design Depertment, Escuela Politécnica Superior, Campus Montpríncipe, Universidad San Pablo CEU, 28668 Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alessandro Cannavale
Energies 2021, 14(13), 3827; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14133827
Received: 23 May 2021 / Revised: 19 June 2021 / Accepted: 21 June 2021 / Published: 25 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Efficiency and Indoor Environment Quality)
The existence of a growing myopia pandemic is an unquestionable fact for health authorities around the world. Different possible causes have been put forward over the years, such as a possible genetic origin, the current excess of children’s close-up work compared to previous stages in history, insufficient natural light, or a multifactorial cause. Scientists are looking for different possible solutions to alleviate it, such as a reduction of time or a greater distance for children’s work, the use of drugs, optometric correction methods, surgical procedures, and spending more time outdoors. There is a growing number of articles suggesting insufficient natural light as a possible cause of the increasing levels of childhood myopia around the globe. Technological progress in the world of lighting is making it possible to have more monochromatic LED emission peaks, and because of this, it is possible to create spectral distributions of visible light that increasingly resemble natural light in the visible range. The possibility of creating indoor luminaires that emit throughout the visible spectrum from purple to infrared can now be a reality that could offer a new avenue of research to fight this pandemic. View Full-Text
Keywords: daylighting; circadian lighting; indoor lighting; dopamine; myopia daylighting; circadian lighting; indoor lighting; dopamine; myopia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baeza Moyano, D.; González-Lezcano, R.A. Pandemic of Childhood Myopia. Could New Indoor LED Lighting Be Part of the Solution? Energies 2021, 14, 3827. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14133827

AMA Style

Baeza Moyano D, González-Lezcano RA. Pandemic of Childhood Myopia. Could New Indoor LED Lighting Be Part of the Solution? Energies. 2021; 14(13):3827. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14133827

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baeza Moyano, David, and Roberto A. González-Lezcano 2021. "Pandemic of Childhood Myopia. Could New Indoor LED Lighting Be Part of the Solution?" Energies 14, no. 13: 3827. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14133827

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