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Article

The Effect of Electric Bridge Lighting at Night on Mayfly Activity

1
Department of Architectural Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
2
Brinjac Lighting Studio, 777 East Park Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17111, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Annika K. Jägerbrand
Energies 2021, 14(10), 2934; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14102934
Received: 20 April 2021 / Revised: 14 May 2021 / Accepted: 17 May 2021 / Published: 19 May 2021
Phototactic and polarotactic aquatic insects, such as mayflies, can be drawn to electric lighting on bridges at night. Past research investigating the effect of light intensity, polarization, and spectrum on mayflies suggests that a combination of different techniques can reduce the number of mayflies attracted to bridges. Here, various lighting strategies are systematically tested on Veterans Memorial Bridge in Pennsylvania to investigate the effect of lighting on mayflies and address safety concerns caused by their mass crowding. Isolated trials on different parts of the bridge tested the effectiveness of correlated color temperature, chromaticity, ultraviolet radiation, shielding, and polarization. Results indicate that mayflies were more attracted to ultraviolet radiation, blue and green light, and polarized light than other lighting conditions. Shielding was minimally effective in reducing the number of mayflies on the bridge when supported by the change in light source spectrum. While the correlated color temperature did not result in a statistically significant impact, the spectral power distribution of the light sources was a major influencer for mayfly activity. Future research should investigate the effect of radiant intensity and timing on mayfly activity. Smart solid-state lighting systems and controls can also be used to adjust the light levels when needed to reduce adverse effects on aquatic insects and aid traffic safety. View Full-Text
Keywords: outdoor nighttime lighting; disruptive nocturnal light exposure; correlated color temperature; light pollution; ecosystem; diel periodicity; phototactic response; aquatic insects; sustainability; polarization outdoor nighttime lighting; disruptive nocturnal light exposure; correlated color temperature; light pollution; ecosystem; diel periodicity; phototactic response; aquatic insects; sustainability; polarization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Durmus, D.; Wang, J.; Good, S.; Basom, B. The Effect of Electric Bridge Lighting at Night on Mayfly Activity. Energies 2021, 14, 2934. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14102934

AMA Style

Durmus D, Wang J, Good S, Basom B. The Effect of Electric Bridge Lighting at Night on Mayfly Activity. Energies. 2021; 14(10):2934. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14102934

Chicago/Turabian Style

Durmus, Dorukalp, Julian Wang, Shawn Good, and Benjamin Basom. 2021. "The Effect of Electric Bridge Lighting at Night on Mayfly Activity" Energies 14, no. 10: 2934. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14102934

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