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The Energy Saving Potential of Wide Windows in Hospital Patient Rooms, Optimizing the Type of Glazing and Lighting Control Strategy under Different Climatic Conditions

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Department of Architecture, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
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CIAS Research Centre for Pollution Control in High Sterility Rooms, Department of Architecture, University of Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
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Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Bologna, 40136 Bologna, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2020, 13(8), 2116; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13082116
Received: 16 February 2020 / Revised: 20 April 2020 / Accepted: 21 April 2020 / Published: 24 April 2020
If not properly designed, the adoption of large windows can sometimes have a negative impact on building energy demand. For this reason, aggravated by the outdated building envelope of the healthcare building stock, large fenestration systems are usually avoided in hospitals, especially in old structures. However, with appropriate glazing specifications, the adoption of wider openings can result into significant energy savings, lower costs and strong positive effects on patients and staff well-being. The present study investigates how different window sizes and types of glazing affect heating, cooling and lighting energy demand in a hospital patient room. The objective is to evaluate the energy savings that may be obtained when installing larger windows and to identify the glazing properties allowing one to reach the maximum energy reductions. Simulations were carried out using nine diverse glazing systems, already available on the market, and their energy performance was evaluated in relation to two different window areas: a common size opening, characterized by a 25% Window-to-Wall Ratio (WWR), and a floor to ceiling window, with 77% WWR. The analysis was conducted taking into consideration four different orientations in four Italian cities, supposing two artificial lighting control strategies. The results highlighted how the adoption of wider windows with appropriate glazings and a daylight-linked dimming lighting control strategy may lower the primary energy demand up to 17%. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy demand; hospital patient rooms; window-to-wall ratio (WWR); glazing specifications; lighting; dynamic building energy simulations; TRNSYS energy demand; hospital patient rooms; window-to-wall ratio (WWR); glazing specifications; lighting; dynamic building energy simulations; TRNSYS
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Cesari, S.; Valdiserri, P.; Coccagna, M.; Mazzacane, S. The Energy Saving Potential of Wide Windows in Hospital Patient Rooms, Optimizing the Type of Glazing and Lighting Control Strategy under Different Climatic Conditions. Energies 2020, 13, 2116.

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