Next Article in Journal
On-Site Identification of the Material Composition of PV Modules with Mobile Spectroscopic Devices
Next Article in Special Issue
Chronological Transition of Relationship between Intracity Lifecycle Transport Energy Efficiency and Population Density
Previous Article in Journal
Space Charge Measurement and Modelling in Cross-Linked Polyethylene
Previous Article in Special Issue
Eco-Energetical Life Cycle Assessment of Materials and Components of Photovoltaic Power Plant
Open AccessArticle

A Building Life-Cycle Embodied Performance Index—The Relationship between Embodied Energy, Embodied Carbon and Environmental Impact

by
School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
Energies 2020, 13(8), 1905; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13081905
Received: 28 March 2020 / Revised: 9 April 2020 / Accepted: 11 April 2020 / Published: 13 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Environmental and Energy Systems)
Knowledge and research tying the environmental impact and embodied energy together is a largely unexplored area in the building industry. The aim of this study is to investigate the practicality of using the ratio between embodied energy and embodied carbon to measure the building’s impact. This study is based on life-cycle assessment and proposes a new measure: life-cycle embodied performance (LCEP), in order to evaluate building performance. In this project, eight buildings located in the same climate zone with similar construction types are studied to test the proposed method. For each case, the embodied energy intensities and embodied carbon coefficients are calculated, and four environmental impact categories are quantified. The following observations can be drawn from the findings: (a) the ozone depletion potential could be used as an indicator to predict the value of LCEP; (b) the use of embodied energy and embodied carbon independently from each other could lead to incomplete assessments; and (c) the exterior wall system is a common significant factor influencing embodied energy and embodied carbon. The results lead to several conclusions: firstly, the proposed LCEP ratio, between embodied energy and embodied carbon, can serve as a genuine indicator of embodied performance. Secondly, environmental impact categories are not dependent on embodied energy, nor embodied carbon. Rather, they are proportional to LCEP. Lastly, among the different building materials studied, metal and concrete express the highest contribution towards embodied energy and embodied carbon. View Full-Text
Keywords: embodied energy; embodied carbon; environmental impact; life-cycle embodied performance embodied energy; embodied carbon; environmental impact; life-cycle embodied performance
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Hu, M. A Building Life-Cycle Embodied Performance Index—The Relationship between Embodied Energy, Embodied Carbon and Environmental Impact. Energies 2020, 13, 1905. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13081905

AMA Style

Hu M. A Building Life-Cycle Embodied Performance Index—The Relationship between Embodied Energy, Embodied Carbon and Environmental Impact. Energies. 2020; 13(8):1905. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13081905

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hu, Ming. 2020. "A Building Life-Cycle Embodied Performance Index—The Relationship between Embodied Energy, Embodied Carbon and Environmental Impact" Energies 13, no. 8: 1905. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13081905

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop