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Article

Influence of Oxidant Agent on Syngas Composition: Gasification of Hazelnut Shells through an Updraft Reactor

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Consiglio per la Ricerca in Agricoltura e l’analisi dell’economia Agraria (CREA)—Centro di Ricerca Ingegneria e Trasformazioni Agroalimentari (CREA-IT), Via della Pascolare 16, 00015 Monterotondo (Rome), Italy
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ENEA-Casaccia Reserch Centre, Via Anguillarese, 301, 0123 Rome, Italy
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Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome, Italy
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Department of Agriculture and Forestry Science, Tuscia University, Via San Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2020, 13(1), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010102
Received: 12 November 2019 / Revised: 14 December 2019 / Accepted: 19 December 2019 / Published: 24 December 2019
This work aims to study the influence of an oxidant agent on syngas quality. A series of tests using air and steam as oxidant agents have been performed and the results compared with those of a pyrolysis test used as a reference. Tests were carried out at Sapienza University of Rome, using an updraft reactor. The reactor was fed with hazelnut shells, waste biomass commonly available in some parts of Italy. Temperature distribution, syngas composition and heating value, and producible energy were measured. Air and steam gasification tests produced about the same amount of syngas flow, but with a different quality. The energy flow in air gasification had the smallest measurement during the experiments. On the contrary, steam gasification produced a syngas flow with higher quality (13.1 MJ/Nm3), leading to the best values of energy flow (about 5.4 MJ/s vs. 3.3 MJ/s in the case of air gasification). From the cold gas efficiency point of view, steam gasification is still the best solution, even considering the effect of the enthalpy associated with the steam injected within the gasification reactor. View Full-Text
Keywords: gasification; biomass; updraft; syngas; oxidizing agent gasification; biomass; updraft; syngas; oxidizing agent
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gallucci, F.; Liberatore, R.; Sapegno, L.; Volponi, E.; Venturini, P.; Rispoli, F.; Paris, E.; Carnevale, M.; Colantoni, A. Influence of Oxidant Agent on Syngas Composition: Gasification of Hazelnut Shells through an Updraft Reactor. Energies 2020, 13, 102. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010102

AMA Style

Gallucci F, Liberatore R, Sapegno L, Volponi E, Venturini P, Rispoli F, Paris E, Carnevale M, Colantoni A. Influence of Oxidant Agent on Syngas Composition: Gasification of Hazelnut Shells through an Updraft Reactor. Energies. 2020; 13(1):102. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010102

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gallucci, Francesco, Raffaele Liberatore, Luca Sapegno, Edoardo Volponi, Paolo Venturini, Franco Rispoli, Enrico Paris, Monica Carnevale, and Andrea Colantoni. 2020. "Influence of Oxidant Agent on Syngas Composition: Gasification of Hazelnut Shells through an Updraft Reactor" Energies 13, no. 1: 102. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010102

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