Next Article in Journal
Linear and Nonlinear Causality between Energy Consumption and Economic Growth: The Case of Mexico 1965–2014
Next Article in Special Issue
Boundary Detection and Enhancement Strategy for Power System Bus Bar Stabilization—Investigation under Fault Conditions for Islanding Operation
Previous Article in Journal
Empirical Modeling of the Viscosity of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Foam Fracturing Fluid under Different Downhole Conditions
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sliding Mode Controller and Lyapunov Redesign Controller to Improve Microgrid Stability: A Comparative Analysis with CPL Power Variation
Open AccessArticle

An Original Transformer and Switched-Capacitor (T & SC)-Based Extension for DC-DC Boost Converter for High-Voltage/Low-Current Renewable Energy Applications: Hardware Implementation of a New T & SC Boost Converter

1
Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, 6700 Esbjerg, Denmark
2
Department of Electrical Engineering, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713 Doha, Qatar
3
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Marathwada Institute of Technology, Aurangabad, Maharashtra 431028, India
4
Centre for Reliable Power Electronics (CORPE), Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, 9100 Aalborg, Denmark
5
Department of Electrical Engineering and Mechatronics, FEI TU of Košice, Letná 9, 04200 Košice, Slovakia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2018, 11(4), 783; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11040783
Received: 25 September 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 29 March 2018
In this article a new Transformer and Switched Capacitor-based Boost Converter (T & SC-BC) is proposed for high-voltage/low-current renewable energy applications. The proposed T & SC-BC is an original extension for DC-DC boost converter which is designed by utilizing a transformer and switched capacitor (T & SC). Photovoltaic (PV) energy is a fast emergent segment among the renewable energy systems. The proposed T & SC-BC combines the features of the conventional boost converter and T & SC to achieve a high voltage conversion ratio. A Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) controller is compulsory and necessary in a PV system to extract maximum power. Thus, a photovoltaic MPPT control mechanism also articulated for the proposed T & SC-BC. The voltage conversion ratio (Vo/Vin) of proposed converter is (1 + k)/(1 − D) where, k is the turns ratio of the transformer and D is the duty cycle (thus, the converter provides 9.26, 13.88, 50/3 voltage conversion ratios at 78.4 duty cycle with k = 1, 2, 2.6, respectively). The conspicuous features of proposed T & SC-BC are: (i) a high voltage conversion ratio (Vo/Vin); (ii) continuous input current (Iin); (iii) single switch topology; (iv) single input source; (v) low drain to source voltage (VDS) rating of control switch; (vi) a single inductor and a single untapped transformer are used. Moreover, the proposed T & SC-BC topology was compared with recently addressed DC-DC converters in terms of number of components, cost, voltage conversion ratio, ripples, efficiency and power range. Simulation and experimental results are provided which validate the functionality, design and concept of the proposed approach. View Full-Text
Keywords: DC-DC boost converter; transformer; switched capacitor; maximum power point tracking; renewable energy; high-voltage; low current DC-DC boost converter; transformer; switched capacitor; maximum power point tracking; renewable energy; high-voltage; low current
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Padmanaban, S.; Bhaskar, M.S.; Maroti, P.K.; Blaabjerg, F.; Fedák, V. An Original Transformer and Switched-Capacitor (T & SC)-Based Extension for DC-DC Boost Converter for High-Voltage/Low-Current Renewable Energy Applications: Hardware Implementation of a New T & SC Boost Converter. Energies 2018, 11, 783.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop