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Article

Screening for Distress and Health Outcomes in Head and Neck Cancer

1
Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
2
Department of Supportive Care, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON M5G 2C1, Canada
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 1R8, Canada
4
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(6), 3793-3806; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060304
Received: 8 April 2022 / Revised: 16 May 2022 / Accepted: 23 May 2022 / Published: 24 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychosocial Effects of Head and Neck Cancer)
Head and neck cancers (HNC) have higher rates of emotional distress than other cancer types and the general population. This paper compares the prevalence of emotional distress in HNC across various distress screening measures and examines whether significant distress or distress screening are associated with cancer-related survival. A retrospective observational cohort design was employed, with data collected from the Distress Assessment and Response Tool (DART) and linkages to administrative databases from 2010 to 2016. Descriptive and prevalence data were reported using multiple concurrently administered distress tools, including the Patient Health Questionaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorders-7 (GAD-7), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale-revised (ESAS-r), and MD Anderson Symptom Index-Head and Neck module (MDASI-HN). Across measures, 7.8 to 28.1% of the sample reported clinically significant emotional distress, with PHQ-9 and GAD-7 identifying lowest prevalence of moderate/severe distress, and the ultrashort distress screens within ESAS-r and MDASI-HN performing equivalently. Cox hazards models were used in univariate and multivariate survival analyses. ESAS depression (≥4), but not anxiety, was associated with increased risk of cancer-related mortality and patient completion of DART was associated with greater cancer-related survival. The findings underscore the importance of implementing routine distress screening for HNC populations and the utility of ultra-brief screening measures. View Full-Text
Keywords: head and neck cancer; distress screening; depression; anxiety; emotional distress; survival; ESAS; MDASI; PHQ-9; GAD-7 head and neck cancer; distress screening; depression; anxiety; emotional distress; survival; ESAS; MDASI; PHQ-9; GAD-7
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gascon, B.; Panjwani, A.A.; Mazzurco, O.; Li, M. Screening for Distress and Health Outcomes in Head and Neck Cancer. Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29, 3793-3806. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060304

AMA Style

Gascon B, Panjwani AA, Mazzurco O, Li M. Screening for Distress and Health Outcomes in Head and Neck Cancer. Current Oncology. 2022; 29(6):3793-3806. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060304

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gascon, Bryan, Aliza A. Panjwani, Olivia Mazzurco, and Madeline Li. 2022. "Screening for Distress and Health Outcomes in Head and Neck Cancer" Current Oncology 29, no. 6: 3793-3806. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060304

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