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Article

Oncologists’ Locus of Control, Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, and the Mediating Role of Helplessness

1
Oncology Breast Unit, Sharett Institute of Oncology, Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem 9574401, Israel
2
School of Behavioral Sciences, The Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo, Yaffo 6818211, Israel
3
Psychology Department, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 5290002, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(3), 1634-1644; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29030137
Received: 27 January 2022 / Revised: 18 February 2022 / Accepted: 1 March 2022 / Published: 4 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Mental Health and Well-Being of Oncology Providers)
The oncology setting may give rise to significant feelings of helplessness among oncologists via patients’ inevitable deaths or suffering. The current study examines whether and how oncologists’ sense of control (locus of control; LOC) influences their compassion fatigue and satisfaction. Methods: Seventy-three oncologists completed the following questionnaires: the Professional Quality of Life scale; Levenson’s Internal, Powerful Others, and Chance scale; the Guilt Inventory, State Guilt subscale; and the Learned Helplessness scale. Results: Oncologists reported high levels of secondary traumatic stress and burnout and moderate levels of compassion satisfaction. A positive association between oncologists’ external LOC and compassion fatigue, and a negative association between oncologists’ internal LOC and compassion fatigue, were found. Helplessness, but not guilt, had a mediating role in these associations. Internal LOC was also positively associated with compassion satisfaction. Conclusions: The current study highlights oncologists as a population at risk of experiencing compassion fatigue and emphasizes oncologists’ locus of control as a predisposition that plays a role in the development of this phenomenon. Additionally, the cognitive as well as the emotional aspects of control were found to be important factors associated with compassion fatigue. View Full-Text
Keywords: oncology; cancer; compassion fatigue; compassion satisfaction; locus of control; guilt; helplessness oncology; cancer; compassion fatigue; compassion satisfaction; locus of control; guilt; helplessness
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MDPI and ACS Style

Braun, M.; Naor, L.; Hasson-Ohayon, I.; Goldzweig, G. Oncologists’ Locus of Control, Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, and the Mediating Role of Helplessness. Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29, 1634-1644. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29030137

AMA Style

Braun M, Naor L, Hasson-Ohayon I, Goldzweig G. Oncologists’ Locus of Control, Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, and the Mediating Role of Helplessness. Current Oncology. 2022; 29(3):1634-1644. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29030137

Chicago/Turabian Style

Braun, Michal, Lee Naor, Ilanit Hasson-Ohayon, and Gil Goldzweig. 2022. "Oncologists’ Locus of Control, Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, and the Mediating Role of Helplessness" Current Oncology 29, no. 3: 1634-1644. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29030137

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