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Case Report

Improving Well-Being in Young Adults: A Social Marketing Proof-of-Concept

Social Marketing @ Griffith, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, Australia
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Academic Editor: William Douglas Evans
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5248; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095248
Received: 14 March 2022 / Revised: 14 April 2022 / Accepted: 20 April 2022 / Published: 26 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Marketing’s Contribution to Public Health)
Approximately 1 in 5 Australians experience a mental disorder every year, costing the Australian economy $56.7 billion per year; therefore, prevention and early intervention are urgently needed. This study reports the evaluation results of a social marketing pilot program that aimed to improve the well-being of young adults. The Elevate Self Growth program aimed to help participants perform various well-being behaviors, including screen time reduction, quality leisure activities, physical activity, physical relaxation, meditation and improved sleep habits. A multi-method evaluation was undertaken to assess Elevate Self Growth for the 19 program participants who paid to participate in the proof-of-concept program. Social Cognitive Theory was used in the program design and guided the evaluation. A descriptive assessment was performed to examine the proof-of-concept program. Considerations were given to participants’ levels of program progress, performance of well-being behaviors, improvements in well-being, and program user experience. Participants who had made progress in the proof-of-concept program indicated improved knowledge, skills, environmental support and well-being in line with intended program outcomes. Program participants recommended improvements to achieve additional progress in the program, which is strongly correlated with outcome changes observed. These improvements are recommended for the proof-of-concept well-being program prior to moving to a full randomized control trial. This paper presents the initial data arising from the first market offerings of a theoretically mapped proof-of-concept and reports insights that suggest promise for approaches that apply Social Cognitive Theory in well-being program design and implementation. View Full-Text
Keywords: well-being; health promotion; behavior change; social marketing; evaluation; theory; intervention; social cognitive theory well-being; health promotion; behavior change; social marketing; evaluation; theory; intervention; social cognitive theory
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MDPI and ACS Style

van Hierden, Y.; Rundle-Thiele, S.; Dietrich, T. Improving Well-Being in Young Adults: A Social Marketing Proof-of-Concept. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 5248. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095248

AMA Style

van Hierden Y, Rundle-Thiele S, Dietrich T. Improving Well-Being in Young Adults: A Social Marketing Proof-of-Concept. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(9):5248. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095248

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Hierden, Yannick, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, and Timo Dietrich. 2022. "Improving Well-Being in Young Adults: A Social Marketing Proof-of-Concept" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 9: 5248. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095248

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