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Article

Shiftwork Is Associated with Higher Food Insecurity in U.S. Workers: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study (NHANES)

1
Center for Complementary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine II, Freiburg University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Univerity of Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg, Germany
2
Independent Researcher, Via Venezuela 66, 98121 Messina, Italy
3
Department of Human Sciences and Promotion of the Quality of Life, San Raffaele Roma Open University, 00166 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mo-Yeol Kang, Tae-Won Jang, Hye-Eun Lee and Dong-Wook Lee
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 2847; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052847
Received: 4 January 2022 / Revised: 23 February 2022 / Accepted: 25 February 2022 / Published: 1 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Effect of Shift Work and Long Working Hours)
The number of shift workers has increased substantially within the last decades to keep pace with the increasingly complex societal need for 24 h services. Shift work has been associated with unhealthy lifestyles and a lower overall diet quality. Little is known, however, with regard to food security and consumer behavior in shift workers. The present study sought to address this gap in the literature, exploring a sample of n = 4418 day workers and n = 1065 shift workers in the United States. Using cross-sectional data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES, 2007–2010), we found that shiftwork was associated with a lower amount of money spent on eating out and higher food insecurity issues. Compared to day workers, a higher proportion of shift workers reported receipt of food stamps (12.5% vs. 23.4%, p < 0.001) and worried about running out of food (3.95% vs. 8.05%, p < 0.001). These associations remained significant after adjustment for confounders when using multivariate logistic regression. The number of not-home-prepared meals did not differ between both groups. In light of the population health disparities and adverse health outcomes associated with food insecurity, novel strategies are urgently warranted to improve the situation of shift workers. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; nutrition; shiftwork; work schedule; consumer behavior; food security; eating habits; away-from-home meals; NHANES; food availability diet; nutrition; shiftwork; work schedule; consumer behavior; food security; eating habits; away-from-home meals; NHANES; food availability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Storz, M.A.; Rizzo, G.; Lombardo, M. Shiftwork Is Associated with Higher Food Insecurity in U.S. Workers: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study (NHANES). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 2847. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052847

AMA Style

Storz MA, Rizzo G, Lombardo M. Shiftwork Is Associated with Higher Food Insecurity in U.S. Workers: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study (NHANES). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(5):2847. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052847

Chicago/Turabian Style

Storz, Maximilian A., Gianluca Rizzo, and Mauro Lombardo. 2022. "Shiftwork Is Associated with Higher Food Insecurity in U.S. Workers: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study (NHANES)" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 5: 2847. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052847

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