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Article

Capturing Household Structure and Mobility within and between Remote Aboriginal Communities in Northern Australia Using Longitudinal Data: A Pilot Study

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Department of Infectious Diseases, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
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Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
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Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia
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Wellbeing and Preventable Chronic Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia
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Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia
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School of Computing and Information Systems, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
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Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia
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Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Gail Garvey, Michelle Dickson, Darren Garvey, Kate Anderson, Kirsten Howard and Alana Gall
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12002; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912002
Received: 18 August 2022 / Revised: 13 September 2022 / Accepted: 20 September 2022 / Published: 22 September 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Wellness for Indigenous Peoples)
Cultural practices and development level can influence a population’s household structures and mixing patterns. Within some populations, households can be organized across multiple dwellings. This likely affects the spread of infectious disease through these communities; however, current demographic data collection tools do not record these data. Methods: Between June and October 2018, the Contact And Mobility Patterns in remote Aboriginal Australian communities (CAMP-remote) pilot study recruited Aboriginal mothers with infants in a remote northern Australian community to complete a monthly iPad-based contact survey. Results: Thirteen mother–infant pairs (participants) completed 69 study visits between recruitment and the end of May 2019. Participants reported they and their other children slept in 28 dwellings during the study. The median dwelling occupancy, defined as people sleeping in the same dwelling on the previous night, was ten (range: 3.5–25). Participants who completed at least three responses (n = 8) slept in a median of three dwellings (range: 2–9). Each month, a median of 28% (range: 0–63%) of the participants travelled out of the community. Including these data in disease transmission models amplified estimates of infectious disease spread in the study community, compared to models parameterized using census data. Conclusions: The lack of data on mixing patterns in populations where households can be organized across dwellings may impact the accuracy of infectious disease models for these communities and the efficacy of public health actions they inform. View Full-Text
Keywords: aboriginal; indigenous; contact patterns; household structure; disease transmission; household model; human mobility aboriginal; indigenous; contact patterns; household structure; disease transmission; household model; human mobility
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goldsmith, J.J.; Campbell, P.T.; Villanueva-Cabezas, J.P.; Chisholm, R.H.; McKinnon, M.; Gurruwiwi, G.G.; Dhurrkay, R.G.; Dockery, A.M.; Geard, N.; Tong, S.Y.C.; McVernon, J.; Gibney, K.B. Capturing Household Structure and Mobility within and between Remote Aboriginal Communities in Northern Australia Using Longitudinal Data: A Pilot Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 12002. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912002

AMA Style

Goldsmith JJ, Campbell PT, Villanueva-Cabezas JP, Chisholm RH, McKinnon M, Gurruwiwi GG, Dhurrkay RG, Dockery AM, Geard N, Tong SYC, McVernon J, Gibney KB. Capturing Household Structure and Mobility within and between Remote Aboriginal Communities in Northern Australia Using Longitudinal Data: A Pilot Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(19):12002. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912002

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goldsmith, Jessie J., Patricia T. Campbell, Juan Pablo Villanueva-Cabezas, Rebecca H. Chisholm, Melita McKinnon, George G. Gurruwiwi, Roslyn G. Dhurrkay, Alfred M. Dockery, Nicholas Geard, Steven Y. C. Tong, Jodie McVernon, and Katherine B. Gibney. 2022. "Capturing Household Structure and Mobility within and between Remote Aboriginal Communities in Northern Australia Using Longitudinal Data: A Pilot Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 19: 12002. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912002

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