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Article

Comparison of the Morphological Characteristics of South African Sub-Elite Female Football Players According to Playing Position

1
Department of Sport, Rehabilitation & Dental Science, Pretoria West Campus, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
2
Physical Activity, Sport and Recreation (PhASRec), North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa
3
Department of Sport Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban University of Technology, Durban 4000, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Stacy T. Sims and Christopher T. Minson
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3603; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073603
Received: 19 February 2021 / Revised: 4 March 2021 / Accepted: 8 March 2021 / Published: 31 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Female Athlete Health in Training and Sports Performance)
Limited information is available on the morphological characteristics of adult female footballers, therefore the aim of this article was to examine if there are position-specific differences in the morphological characteristics of sub-elite female football players and to establish normative standards for this level of female football players. The morphological features of 101 sub-elite female football players (age: 21.8 ± 2.7 years) were assessed. Twenty anthropometric sites were measured for body composition and somatotype. The average value of body fat percentage was 20.8 ± 5.7%. The somatotype of the overall group was 4.0–2.4–2.1. Significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences were found between goalkeepers and outfield players in morphological characteristics. Goalkeepers were taller (166.2 ± 8.4 cm), heavier (66.5 ± 5.1 kg), possessed the highest body fat percentage (17.2 ± 6.2%) and showed higher values for all skinfold (sum of 6 skinfolds = 125.6 ± 45.9 cm), breadth, girth and length measurements. However, there were very few practically worthwhile differences between the outfield positions. Positional groups did not differ (p ≤ 0.05) in somatotype characteristics either. The study suggests that at sub-elite level there are mainly differences between goalkeepers and outfield players, but outfield players are homogeneous when comparing morphological characteristics. These results may serve as normative values for future comparisons regarding the morphological characteristics of female football players. View Full-Text
Keywords: anthropometry; height; somatotype; body mass; soccer; sports performance anthropometry; height; somatotype; body mass; soccer; sports performance
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MDPI and ACS Style

Strauss, A.; Sparks, M.; Pienaar, C. Comparison of the Morphological Characteristics of South African Sub-Elite Female Football Players According to Playing Position. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3603. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073603

AMA Style

Strauss A, Sparks M, Pienaar C. Comparison of the Morphological Characteristics of South African Sub-Elite Female Football Players According to Playing Position. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(7):3603. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073603

Chicago/Turabian Style

Strauss, Anita, Martinique Sparks, and Cindy Pienaar. 2021. "Comparison of the Morphological Characteristics of South African Sub-Elite Female Football Players According to Playing Position" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 7: 3603. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073603

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