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Article

Experimental Evaluation of Aerosol Production after Dental Ultrasonic Instrumentation: An Analysis on Fine Particulate Matter Perturbation

1
Department of Surgical, Medical and Molecular Pathology and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
2
Sub-Unit of Periodontology, Halitosis and Periodontal Medicine, University Hospital of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
3
Hygiene and Epidemiology Unit, Department of Translational Research and the New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Filippo Graziani and Rossana Izzetti equally contributed to the manuscript.
Academic Editor: Paul Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073357
Received: 3 February 2021 / Revised: 18 March 2021 / Accepted: 20 March 2021 / Published: 24 March 2021
Aerosol production represents a major concern during the majority of dental procedures. The aim of the present study is to investigate the dynamics of aerosol particles after 15 min of continuous supragingival ultrasonic instrumentation with no attempt of containment through particle count analysis. Eight volunteers were treated with supragingival ultrasonic instrumentation of the anterior buccal region. A gravimetric impactor was positioned 1 m away and at the same height of the head of the patient. Particles of different sizes (0.3–10 µm) were measured at the beginning of instrumentation, at the end of instrumentation (EI), and then every 15 min up to 105 min. The 0.3-µm particles showed non-significant increases at 15/30 min. The 0.5–1-µm particles increased at EI (p < 0.05), and 0.5 µm remained high for another 15 min. Overall, all submicron aerosol particles showed a slow decrease to normal values. Particles measuring 3–5 µm showed non-significant increases at EI. Particles measuring 10 µm did not show any increases but a continuous reduction (p < 0.001 versus 0.3 µm, p < 0.01 versus 0.5 µm, and p < 0.05 versus 1–3 µm). Aerosol particles behaved differently according to their dimensions. Submicron aerosols peaked after instrumentation and slowly decreased after the end of instrumentation, whilst larger particles did not show any significant increases. This experimental study produces a benchmark for the measurement of aerosol particles during dental procedures and raises some relevant concerns about indoor air quality after instrumentation. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerosols; particulate matter; dental scaling; occupational exposure; air pollution; indoor; air quality aerosols; particulate matter; dental scaling; occupational exposure; air pollution; indoor; air quality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Graziani, F.; Izzetti, R.; Lardani, L.; Totaro, M.; Baggiani, A. Experimental Evaluation of Aerosol Production after Dental Ultrasonic Instrumentation: An Analysis on Fine Particulate Matter Perturbation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3357. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073357

AMA Style

Graziani F, Izzetti R, Lardani L, Totaro M, Baggiani A. Experimental Evaluation of Aerosol Production after Dental Ultrasonic Instrumentation: An Analysis on Fine Particulate Matter Perturbation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(7):3357. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073357

Chicago/Turabian Style

Graziani, Filippo, Rossana Izzetti, Lisa Lardani, Michele Totaro, and Angelo Baggiani. 2021. "Experimental Evaluation of Aerosol Production after Dental Ultrasonic Instrumentation: An Analysis on Fine Particulate Matter Perturbation" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 7: 3357. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073357

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