Next Article in Journal
Experimental Evaluation of Aerosol Production after Dental Ultrasonic Instrumentation: An Analysis on Fine Particulate Matter Perturbation
Previous Article in Journal
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Sources of Information on Vaccines in Spanish Nursing Students: A Cross-Sectional Study
Article

Older Adults Who Spend More Time Outdoors in Summer and Have Higher Dietary Vitamin D Than Younger Adults Can Present at Least as High Vitamin D Status: A Pilot Study

1
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
2
Division of Musculoskeletal and Dermatological Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine Biology and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
3
Photobiology Unit, Dermatology Research Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M6 8HD, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Lorrene Ritchie
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3364; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073364
Received: 30 January 2021 / Revised: 19 March 2021 / Accepted: 23 March 2021 / Published: 24 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Aging)
Vitamin D3 can be produced by exposing skin to UVB radiation or sourced through dietary products. It is often stated that vitamin D status declines in older adults, yet little is known about differences in current-day lifestyle and dietary behaviours influencing vitamin D outcomes in younger (18–40 years old) and older adults (65–89 years old). Our objectives were to perform a pilot study to compare sun exposure behaviours, i.e., time spent outdoors, holiday behaviour and use of sunscreen/clothing, and dietary vitamin D intake, in young and older adults in the UK, together with assessment of their vitamin D status. A total of 13 young and 11 older volunteers completed a four-page questionnaire to assess sun exposure and photoprotective behaviour and an eleven-page one-week vitamin D diet diary, alongside their plasma 25(OH)D measurement. It was found that the older group tended to spend more time outdoors during the working week in summer, to take more summer and winter holidays each year, take longer winter holidays and have similar sunscreen use when compared to younger adults. Older adults had a significantly higher daily dietary intake of vitamin D (4.0 μg) than young adults (2.4 μg). Mean winter 25(OH)D concentration was higher in older (56.9 nmol/L) than in young adults (43.2 nmol/L), but there was no statistical difference between the groups. Contrary to common assumptions, in this study, older adults had sun exposure and dietary behaviours conferring a vitamin D status at least as good as that of younger adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin D; sunlight exposure; diet; older adults vitamin D; sunlight exposure; diet; older adults
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Borecka, O.; Farrar, M.D.; Osman, J.E.; Rhodes, L.E.; Webb, A.R. Older Adults Who Spend More Time Outdoors in Summer and Have Higher Dietary Vitamin D Than Younger Adults Can Present at Least as High Vitamin D Status: A Pilot Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3364. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073364

AMA Style

Borecka O, Farrar MD, Osman JE, Rhodes LE, Webb AR. Older Adults Who Spend More Time Outdoors in Summer and Have Higher Dietary Vitamin D Than Younger Adults Can Present at Least as High Vitamin D Status: A Pilot Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(7):3364. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073364

Chicago/Turabian Style

Borecka, Oktawia, Mark D. Farrar, Joanne E. Osman, Lesley E. Rhodes, and Ann R. Webb 2021. "Older Adults Who Spend More Time Outdoors in Summer and Have Higher Dietary Vitamin D Than Younger Adults Can Present at Least as High Vitamin D Status: A Pilot Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 7: 3364. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073364

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop