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Article

Load Transference with the Gain of Excessive Body Mass: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study

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National Engineering Research Center of Clean Technology in Leather Industry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, China
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Key Laboratory of Leather Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, China
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Rongcheng Customs District P.R. China, Fuzhou 350015, China
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Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University, 76001 Zlin, Czech Republic
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Han C. G. Kemper
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2879; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062879
Received: 3 February 2021 / Revised: 8 March 2021 / Accepted: 9 March 2021 / Published: 11 March 2021
Previous studies investigating the effect of excessive weight on the foot have commonly been cross-sectional; therefore, it is still unclear how the foot function gradually changes with the increased body mass that is physiologically gained over time. This study aimed to use a load transfer method to identify the mechanism of how the foot function changed with the increased excessive body mass over two years. Taking normal weight as the baseline, fifteen children became overweight or obese (group 1), and fifteen counterparts maintained normal weight (group 0) over the two years. Barefoot walking was assessed using a Footscan® plate system. A load transfer method was used based upon the relative force–time integral (FTI) to provide an insight into plantar load transference as children increased in weight. Significantly increased FTIs were found at the big toe (BT), medial metatarsal (MM), lateral metatarsal (LM), and lateral heel (HL) in group 1, while at BT, MM, medial heel (HM), and HL in group 0. Foot load showed a posterior to anterior transferal from midfoot (2.5%) and heel (7.0%) to metatarsal and big toe in group 1. The control group, however, shifted the loading within the metatarsal level from LM to HM (4.1%), and equally relieved weight from around the midfoot (MF) (3.0%) to BT, MM, HM and HL. Earlier weight loss intervention is required to prevent further adverse effects on foot functions caused by excessive weight-bearing. View Full-Text
Keywords: foot function; overweight children; obese children; load transfer; follow-up study foot function; overweight children; obese children; load transfer; follow-up study
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, R.; Liu, Q.; Chen, X.; Yan, S.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, L.; Badurova, J.; Yang, L.; Fan, H. Load Transference with the Gain of Excessive Body Mass: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062879

AMA Style

Li R, Liu Q, Chen X, Yan S, Zhao Y, Zhang L, Badurova J, Yang L, Fan H. Load Transference with the Gain of Excessive Body Mass: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(6):2879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062879

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Ruoyi, Qingyun Liu, Xuecan Chen, Shiyang Yan, Yihong Zhao, Linshan Zhang, Jitka Badurova, Luming Yang, and Haojun Fan. 2021. "Load Transference with the Gain of Excessive Body Mass: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 6: 2879. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062879

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