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Article

Wheeled Mobility Use on Accessible Fixed-Route Transit: A Field Study in Environmental Docility

by 1 and 2,*
1
Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0020, USA
2
Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2117, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Derek Clements-Croome, Joost van Hoof and Thilo Kroll
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2840; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062840
Received: 10 January 2021 / Revised: 18 February 2021 / Accepted: 4 March 2021 / Published: 10 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing in Place for People with Disabilities)
Multiple field studies provide qualitative accounts of usability barriers experienced by users of wheeled mobility devices on public transit. This study aimed to examine these usability barriers from the theoretical perspective of Environmental Docility by quantifying the relationship between functional capabilities of wheeled mobility device users and ingress–egress performance on accessible fixed-route transit vehicles in an urban setting. Twenty-eight wheeled mobility users each completed three trips on a predetermined route through the local public transit system. Ingress and egress times, user-reported usability ratings and open-ended comments were analyzed. Regression analyses indicated significant interactions between age and minimum parallel-park length on ingress and egress times. Specifically, lower functional capability reflected in older age and less maneuvering ability predicted decreased performance (longer ingress–egress times), indicating less adaptability to environmental demands and agreement with the Environmental Docility Hypothesis. Usability ratings and comments revealed difficulty with negotiating access ramps and turning maneuvers in the vehicle interior and in proximity to other passengers. Despite compliance with accessibility standards, current design of transit vehicles present substantial usability barriers for wheeled mobility users. Environmental Docility provides a theoretical basis to identifying modifiable factors related to person and environment for improving usability of public transit for people aging and/or with mobility impairments. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental docility; wheeled mobility; accessibility; usability; public transit environmental docility; wheeled mobility; accessibility; usability; public transit
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lim, S.; D’Souza, C. Wheeled Mobility Use on Accessible Fixed-Route Transit: A Field Study in Environmental Docility. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062840

AMA Style

Lim S, D’Souza C. Wheeled Mobility Use on Accessible Fixed-Route Transit: A Field Study in Environmental Docility. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(6):2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062840

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lim, Sol, and Clive D’Souza. 2021. "Wheeled Mobility Use on Accessible Fixed-Route Transit: A Field Study in Environmental Docility" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 6: 2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062840

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