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Open AccessArticle

Effects of Post-Exertional Malaise on Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

School of Sport, Exercise and Nutrition, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
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Academic Editors: Pantelis T. Nikolaidis and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2366; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052366
Received: 20 December 2020 / Revised: 19 February 2021 / Accepted: 20 February 2021 / Published: 28 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of Clinical Exercise Physiologists on Health and Wellbeing)
Background: Evidence is emerging that individuals with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) may suffer from chronic vascular dysfunction as a result of illness-related oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. The study aimed to examine the impact of maximal-intensity aerobic exercise on vascular function 48 and 72 h into recovery. Methods: ME/CFS (n = 11) with gender and age-matched controls (n = 11) were randomly assigned to either a 48 h or 72 h protocol. Each participant had measures of brachial blood pressure, augmentation index (AIx75, standardized to 75 bpm) and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) taken. This was followed by a maximal incremental cycle exercise test. Resting measures were repeated 48 or 72 h later (depending on group allocation). Results: No significant differences were found when ME/CFS were directly compared to controls at baseline. During recovery, the 48 h control group experienced a significant 7.2% reduction in AIx75 from baseline measures (p < 0.05), while the matched ME/CFS experienced no change in AIx75. The 72 h ME/CFS group experienced a non-significant increase of 1.4% from baseline measures. The 48 h and 72 h ME/CFS groups both experienced non-significant improvements in crPWV (0.56 ms−1 and 1.55 ms−1, respectively). Conclusions: The findings suggest that those with ME/CFS may not experience exercise-induced vasodilation due to chronic vascular damage, which may be a contributor to the onset of post-exertional malaise (PEM). View Full-Text
Keywords: myalgic encephalomyelitis; chronic fatigue syndrome; arterial stiffness; post-exertional malaise myalgic encephalomyelitis; chronic fatigue syndrome; arterial stiffness; post-exertional malaise
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bond, J.; Nielsen, T.; Hodges, L. Effects of Post-Exertional Malaise on Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2366. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052366

AMA Style

Bond J, Nielsen T, Hodges L. Effects of Post-Exertional Malaise on Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(5):2366. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052366

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bond, Joshua; Nielsen, Tessa; Hodges, Lynette. 2021. "Effects of Post-Exertional Malaise on Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 5: 2366. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052366

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